YEMEN GOES CRITICAL MASS SUEZ CANAL TRANSIT LANES NOW THREATENED

I will point out to you Iran has already made public statements to the effect the Houthi Tribal Militias are armed with ship killer missiles. The same type Hezzbollah used in its war with Israel. The one that  heavily damaged one of Israel’s coastal patrol boats. The Houthis have also openly said they will unleash a wave of suicide attacks, car bombings and lone wolf style attacks INSIDE of Saudi Arabia if a ground invasion happens. Further, Iran has Russian built Kilo class submarines with full mine laying abilities.

Yep, we are going over the edge now. It is like Wiley Coyote clawing at the branch growing out of the canyon wall before he falls into the chasm. The most likely scenario for a direct US Navy combat role is either mine sweeping or firefights with Iranian Revolutionary Guard naval units. These range from the Kilo subs, speed boats armed with rapid fire heavy machine guns, rockets and possibly ship killer missiles.

I am also telling you all quite plainly the first missile hit on ANY civilian freighter or tanker transiting the Suez Canal and Red Sea corridors will have a devastating economic and military impact. For one thing, the shipping insurance companies are going to DEMAND NAVAL ESCORT for any ships using the Suez Canal.

Doomer Doug, a.k.a. Doug McIntosh now has a blog at www.doomerdoug.wordpress.com
My end of the world e book “Day of the Dogs” will soon be available for sale at smashwords. The url is
https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/267340 It is also at the following url
http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B007BRLFYU

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-03-31/oil-jumps-houthis-enter-el-mandeb-strait-military-base

Houthi rebels have reportedly entered the military base at the stratgeic Bab el-Mandeb Strait, according to Reuters. This is the 4th largest oil-shipping chokepoint in the world

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-03-31/after-saudis-deny-need-send-ground-troops-yemen-invasion-imminent

After Saudis Deny “Need To Send Ground Troops To Yemen”, Is Invasion Imminent?
Tyler Durden’s picture
Submitted by Tyler Durden on 03/31/2015 14:55 -0400

With Decisive Storm airstrikes showing no signs of abating, and with some reports suggesting that as many as 40 people were killed when bombs struck a refugee camp near Haradh, many suspect the violence in Yemen is set to escalate meaningfully in the days and weeks ahead with Saudi Arabia preparing to launch a ground invasion in the expanding effort to debilitate the Iranian-backed Houthi rebels who toppled the US-supported Yemeni government.

The bombing raids by the Saudi-led coalition have persisted for five consecutive days in Sanaa and al-Hodeidah where air strikes targeted anti-aircraft installations. The Yemeni foreign minister denied that the coalition was responsible for the death of refugees and instead placed the blame on rebel artillery fire.

Via Al Arabiya:

Yemen’s foreign minister blamed Iranian-allied Houthi fighters for an air strike on a camp for displaced people and refugees in northern Yemen that killed at least 45 people on Monday, denying any link to Saudi-led military operations.

Riyadh Yaseen was speaking to reporters in the Saudi capital Riyadh. He said the explosion on the camp was not from Arab coalition forces but by “artillery strikes” by the Shiite Muslim Houthis.

Meanwhile, in what is perhaps the surest sign that a ground invasion is in fact in the offing, the Saudis are out saying there’s currently no need to put boots on the ground:

And as CNN notes, a ground war with the Houthis is likely to be an arduous, bloody affair that could further imperil Saudi Arabia’s southern border:

But if the coalition takes the fight to the ground in Yemen, the consequences could be severe. Houthis are battle-hardened guerrilla fighters and could cross into Saudi Arabia. They’ve already threatened suicide bomb attacks inside Saudi Arabia…

Saudi Arabia and Egypt have both talked about the possibility of putting boots on the ground. On Saturday, Yemeni Foreign Minister Riyadh Yaseen said he expected coalition troops to be in Yemen within days.

Saudi leaders have said that if troops do go in, they won’t leave until they have degraded the Houthis’ ability to fight. The Houthis are apt guerrillas. A fight on the ground could prove bloody and lengthy.

Unfortunately, it now appears that this “bloody and lengthy” conflict just got a little closer to becoming reality as Reuters reports that Houthi rebels have gained access to a military base at the Bab el-Mandeb Strait, the 4th largest oil-shipping chokepoint in the world. As CNN notes, “that passage that is the only access from the Arabian Sea to Egypt’s Suez Canal.”

Here’s more via Reuters on the rebels’ advance…

Fighters from Yemen’s Houthi militia on Tuesday entered a coastal military base overlooking the Red Sea’s strategic Bab el-Mandeb strait, local officials told Reuters.

Soldiers of the 17th Armoured Division in the Dabab district in Yemen’s southwestern Taiz province opened the gates to the Houthis, whose military advance has been challenged by six days of Saudi-led air strikes.

AND SO IT BEGINS: YEMEN WAR SPREADS 3-28-2015

I said the “Yemen Crisis” would not long stay confined to Yemen. It will spread widely as the various proxy groups seek a decisive victory over their rivals. And so it has, as the various players up the ante. We are now seeing the first wave of a tsunami that will swamp the entire Middle East in fire and blood.

I will say it again: this is a RELIGIOUS WAR, OR JIHAD, BETWEEN SUNNI AND SHIA MUSLIMS. Since this is the case, we are no longer in the realm of rational thought or action. We are now in the realm of emotion, blood feud and the kind of violence only seen in wars based on the absolute belief of moral superiority. The bottom line is we are well beyond political, economic, or even military considerations. We are now in the realm of “kill everybody and let Allah sort it out.” We are now looking at a war involving GENOCIDE AND WAR CRIMES BETWEEN SUNNI AND SHIA MUSLIMS. If anybody is expecting an outbreak of sanity between Sunni Saudi Arabia and Egypt against Shia Iran, they are going to be stunned at the level of open barbarism unleashed. We haven’t seen the kind of casual brutality in the West since the savage religious wars in Europe several centuries ago. The Serbs and Kosovo are the most recent examples of the kind of scorched earth and bury the bodies in mass graves type of warfare now going on in Yemen and Iraq.

I will also remind you Iran has pulled out its combat troops from the Tikrit attacks in protest of US airstrikes against ISIS. I will further remind you all Iran has nearly 500,000, yes 500,000, well armed Shia militia in Iraq right now. If Iran pulls out of the attack on ISIS, which they have done, it will free them up for a direct attack on the Gulf States, like Kuwait, now bombing the Shia Houthi in Yemen. The only reason Iran won’t do this is if they get a free hand from Obama on their nuclear enrichment program. Obama is likely doing this to try and keep a lid on till he leaves office in 18 months or so.

I also said Saudi Arabia and Egypt would make good on their threat to seal off Yemen from Iranian resupply efforts. It didn’t take long for naval warships to be deployed off Yemen to do exactly that. Assuming Iran attempts to resupply by ship the Houthi, it will lead to a direct combat naval engagement in the Red Sea. After that, well that alone will trigger a much wider war than Yemen alone. In fact, I no longer see how a wider regional war can now be avoided. We have a coalition of ten Sunni nations attacking Shia Muslims in Yemen. And I am telling you all, Iran isn’t going to take it. I am not sure exactly how far Iran is going to go in its military response. I will merely add that the Houthi are now openly threatening suicide attacks inside Saudi Arabia and Egypt. Iran is also, in my opinion, going to go after the Sunni Gulf States anyway it can. The first link shows the call for Jihad I was talking about. Further, the Houthi are now starting to deploy combat forces on the Yemen/Saudi border. Saudi Arabia has already been massing troops on its border with Yemen for the last several days.

http://www.latimes.com/world/middleeast/la-fg-egypt-president-backs-joint-arab-military-force-20150328-story.html

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/middle_east/how-the-yemen-conflict-risks-new-chaos-in-the-middle-east/2015/03/27/1c4e7b5c-d417-11e4-8b1e-274d670aa9c9_story.html

An Iranian parliamentarian told the semi­official Fars News Agency that the Houthis possess missiles capable of hitting up to 500 kilometers, or about 300 miles, inside Saudi Arabia. An unidentified official quoted by the agency said the Houthis were preparing to block access to the Bab al-Mandeb strait, which commands access to the Red Sea, through which the Egyptian warships are sailing.

http://www.presstv.ir/Detail/2015/03/28/403659/Saudiled-warships-off-to-Yemen-coast

Sat Mar 28, 2015 5:24AM
A picture taken on March 26, 2015 shows an Egyptian navy FFG-7 frigate passing through the Suez Canal on its way to the Red Sea. © AFP

A picture taken on March 26, 2015 shows an Egyptian navy FFG-7 frigate passing through the Suez Canal on its way to the Red Sea. © AFP

Saudi Arabia and Egypt have reportedly deployed warships to the strategic strait of Bab el-Mandab off Yemen’s coast in an apparent preparation for a ground intervention in the Arabian Peninsula.

A number of Egyptian and Saudi vessels have been sent to the strait, which is the only access to Egypt’s Suez Canal from the Arabian Sea, according to several unnamed Egyptian military officials cited in a report by The Associated Press on Friday.

The officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity, added that the warships from the two countries were already at or near Bab el-Mandab. One official also said two destroyers and two other vessels had arrived at the strait.

This is while Riyad Yassin, who served as Yemen’s foreign minister in the cabinet of fugitive president, Abd Ruabbuh Mansur Hadi, told the Saudi-owned Al-Arabiya news channel that Egyptian naval forces are on their way to Bab el-Mandab.

According to Yassin, there was an “arrangement” for ground troops to be deployed to Yemen, which has witnessed deadly Saudi-led air raids against the Houthi Ansarullah movement since March 26.

Meanwhile, retired Yemeni army officer Nasser al-Marqashi stated that the airstrikes would continue for a week before a ground attack, which would likely be launched from Yemen’s seaport city of Aden or the country’s Hadramout Province, another pro-Hadi stronghold.

The Al Saud regime’s aerial campaign is aimed at restoring Hadi, a close ally of Riyadh and the West, to power. This is while the Houthis say he lost his legitimacy as president of Yemen after escaping the capital, Sana’a, to Aden on February 21.

A member of the Yemeni security forces sits above debris at the site of a Saudi air strike against Houthi fighters near the Sana’a Airport on March 26, 2015. © AFP

In January, the Yemeni president and the cabinet of Prime Minister Khaled Bahah stepped down and refused to reconsider the decision despite calls by the Ansarullah movement. However, the parliament rejected the resignation.

Earlier this month, the fugitive president fled Aden to the Saudi capital after Ansarullah revolutionaries advanced on the southern Yemeni city, where he had sought to set up a rival power base.

The Ansarullah fighters took control of the capital in September 2014 and are currently moving southward. The revolutionaries said the Hadi government had been too weak to rein in the growing wave corruption and terrorism plaguing Yemen.

The Riyadh regime’s blatant invasion of Yemen’s sovereignty comes against a backdrop of total silence on the part of international bodies, especially the United Nations. The world body has so far failed to show any reaction to the Saudi violation of Yemen’s sovereignty.

Reports say at least 40 civilians have so far lost their lives in the Saudi-led aerial assaults against Yemen.

YEMEN GROUND INVASION BY SAUDI ARABIA “IMMINENT.” 3-26-15

And so it has begun, just as Doomer Doug predicted over two months ago. I said on January 21st over at timebomb2000.com Iran was making the first moves in a long planned policy to directly take on the Sunni Muslims. This has now started and it will be a general, full scale regional war covering the Middle East in Iraq, Iran, Yemen and Syria. The Sunni and Shia Muslims have been fighting each other since 650, yes 650 AD. I will also bluntly advise you of two things. The first is Iran is going to allow its Houthi proxies to kick the crap out of any Sunni military forces now part of this Sunni invasion of Yemen. And I have to tell you, the combat performance of these lean, mean, tribal, desert warriors compared to the Saudi, Egyptian and “other” forces is going to be seriously lethal compared to what amounts to garrison troops. The second thing is we are now dealing with a SUNNI/SHIA MUSLIM RELIGIOUS WAR. The corporate whore media is saying this and that about Yemen. They have no idea what they are talking about in my opinion. This is JIHAD in Yemen and nothing less and I have to say these punk, elite “experts” don’t have a clue about true desert warriors like the Houthi. If you want to understand what these pampered Saudi and Egyptian troops are going to facing take a look at the Bedouin warriors in David Lean’s movie. I actually saw one of these clowns talking about how the air strikes are going to “degrade” the Houthi. I mean these morons actually believe this drivel. They actually believe you can pound desert warriors to pieces if they don’t want to be found.

Yep, everybody, including the USA under Obama, is going to mix it up for the simple reason Iran is going to take the gloves off. The news media is reporting this is about Yemen. It is not. It is about the over 1300 year long battle between Shia and Sunni Muslims. If you want to understand that, well then think back to Serbia/Kosovo and the fact that was all about a battle that happened in 1300, a mere 700 years ago. I am telling you the Sunni forces have no idea, absolutely no idea, the fecal storm they have stirred up.

One: The so called “Yemen War,” is going to explode into Eastern Saudi Arabia, the Gulf States, Iraq and Syria within 72 hours from now. You may rest assured that ALL IRANIAN SHIA FORCES are going to attack any Sunni forces anywhere and anytime they can. I fully expect mass riots/demonstrations in Bahrain within 24 to 48 hours. Further, I am telling you Saudi Arabia is going to light up like a Christmas tree.

Two. The Suez Canal and the Strait of Hormuz are now FULLY IN PLAY. We may very well see a tanker war start within the next 48 hours also.

Three. Iran now has nothing at all to lose in Yemen. Iran has every reason to plunge Yemen, Saudi Arabia, The Gulf States into as much chaos as it possibly can. Yep, nobody is going to hold back now at all.

The Neo-Con warmongers like McCain et al have got their much desired Middle Eastern War. It will be very interesting to see if Putin exploits the chaos and goes after the Ukraine. We are now looking at a “wall of war,” from the Ukraine, Iraq, Syria and now down to Yemen.

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-03-26/yemen-ground-invasion-saudi-arabia-troops-imminent

As reported first thing today, while the initial phase of the military campaign against Yemen has been taking place for the past 18 hours and been exclusively one of airborne assaults by forces of the “Decisive Storm” coalition, Saudi hinted at what is coming next following reports that it had built up a massive 150,000 troop deployment on the border with Yemen.

And as expected, moments ago AP reported that Egyptian military and security officials told The Associated Press that the military intervention will go further, with a ground assault into Yemen by Egyptian, Saudi and other forces, planned once airstrikes have weakened the capabilities of the rebels.

Will this invasion mean that Yemen as we know it will no longer exist and become annexed by Saudi Arabia? According to coalition military sources, the answer is no, but that remains to be seen:

Three Egyptian military and security officials told The Associated Press that a coalition of countries led by Egypt and Saudi Arabia will conduct a ground invasion into Yemen once the airstrikes have sufficiently diminished the Houthis and Saleh’s forces. They said the assault will be by ground from Saudi Arabia and by landings on Yemen’s Red and Arabian Sea coasts.

The aim is not to occupy Yemen but to weaken the Houthis and their allies until they enter negotiations for power-sharing, the officials said.

They said three to five Egyptian troop carriers are stationed off Yemen’s coasts. They would not specify the numbers of troops or when the operation would begin. They spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to talk about the plans with the press.

Egypt’s leadership role in the next stage of the campaign has come as somewhat of a surprise to observers. Egypt’s presidency said in a statement Thursday that its naval and air forces were participating in the coalition campaign already. Egypt is “prepared for participation with naval, air and ground forces if necessary,” Foreign Minister Sameh Shukri said at a gathering of Arab foreign ministers preparing for a weekend Arab summit in the Egyptian resort of Sharm el-Sheikh.

This may be just the beginning:

The Arab Summit starting Saturday is expected to approve the creation of a new joint Arab military force to intervene in regional crises. The Egyptian security and military officials said the force is planned to include some 40,000 men backed by jet fighters, warships and light armor. Hadi is expected to attend the summit.

The locals do not sound much enthused about the prospect of allowing foreign troops to enter their country uncontested, and as AP notes, support for the Houthis is far from universal in Yemen – but foreign intervention risks bringing a backlash.

On Thursday, thousands gathered outside Sanaa’s old city in the Houthi-organized protest, chanting against Saudi Arabia and the United States.

Khaled al-Madani, a Houthi activist, told the crowd that “God was on the side of Yemen.” He blasted Saudi Arabia saying it is “buying mercenaries with money to attack Yemen. But Yemen will, God willing, will be their tomb.”

Anger against the strikes was already brewing – particularly after airstrikes targeting an air base near Sanaa’s airport flattening half a dozen homes in an impoverished neighborhood and killing at least 18 civilians, according to the health ministry.

For now Yemeni anger is focused on Saudi Arabia:

TV stations affiliated with the rebels and Saleh showed the aftermath of the strikes Thursday. Yemen Today, a TV station affiliated with Saleh, showed hundreds of residents congregating around the rubbles, some chanting “Death to Al-Saud”, in reference to the kingdom’s royal family. The civilians were sifting through the rubble, pulling out mattresses, bricks and shrapnel.

Ahmed al-Sumaini said an entire alley close to the airport was wiped out in the strikes overnight. He said people ran out from their homes in the middle of the night, many jolted out of bed to run into the streets. “These people have nothing to do with the Houthis or with Hadi. This is destructive. These random acts will push people toward Houthis,” he said, as he waved shrapnel from the strikes.

Strikes also hit in the southern province Lahj and the stronghold of Houthis in the northern Saada province. In Sanaa, they also hit the camp of U.S.-trained Yemeni special forces, which is controlled by generals loyal to Saleh, and a missile base held by the Houthis.

But that will soon change, as it is a virtual certainty that the US will intervene at a point in the near future, with its own military assets. So while we await to see just where US troops make landfall, here is the most updated map showing the locations of US naval assets around the globe in general, and in proximity to Yemen in particular. Keep a very close eye on the LHD-7 Iwo Jima amphibious assault ship (which carries some 2,000 marines of the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit), currently located just off the coast of Yemen.

YEMEN GOES CRITICAL/ SAUDI ARABIA MASSES FORCES ON BORDER 3-25-2015

Blog readers here at doomerdoug.wordpress.com are not surprised at the blood soaked chaos and anarchy now exploding in Yemen. I have kept you well informed over these last few weeks as Iran makes the final moves toward Middle Eastern control. It is isn’t like Iran has been shy about the true intentions behind its combat deployments in Iraq, Syria, and Yemen. The mainstream, corporate whore press may have finally noticed Yemen in the last two or three days, but I have been “on it” since the Houthis took over Saana and kicked out the farce of a “pro-western” President. He is the one that just fled for his life.

At any rate, Yemen is now “in play” at all levels. It will be story one; crisis one as our Marxist Tyrant in Chief continues his delusional attempt to “engage Iran.” Let Doomer Doug be clear about any attempts to “engage” Iran by our esteemed Marxist Moron: Iran is not interested in anything other than military conquest. The famous battle over “Iran getting nukes” fails to understand Iran has had Russian tactical nukes, like artillery shells and naval munitions since the mid 1990s Soviet “collapse.” Iran has had the ability to detonate a so called “dirty bomb,” for at least the last decade or so. It is the Iranian attempt to use centrifuges to enrich uranium to make long range missile warheads, also using that other crazy nation North Korea, Obama has completely failed to understand, much less deal with. Obama has allowed Iran to continue its ongoing OFFENSIVE NUCLEAR WEAPONS PROGRAM in his “engagement” process. And for that alone, Obama is the biggest damn fool in human history.

The following links indicate how critical the Yemen situation really is. It is a fact Iran is now fully in control of its proxy forces, the Houthi tribal militias, and is using them to directly engage Sunnis when it can. This means DIRECT MILITARY CONFRONTATION BETWEEN AL QUAIDA OF THE ARABIAN PENINSULA AND SAUDI ARABIA, THE GULF STATE SUNNI MUSLIMS IS NOW HAPPENING. It will lead to a proxy war between Iran/Shia and Saudi Arabai/Sunni that will light up the Middle East from one end to the other.

Doomer Doug, a.k.a. Doug McIntosh now has a blog at www.doomerdoug.wordpress.com
My end of the world e book “Day of the Dogs” will soon be available for sale at smashwords. The url is
https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/267340 It is also at the following url
http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B007BRLFYU

The following are posted under fair use. It is entirely likely massive military deployments will now pour into Yemen from Saudi Arabia and the Gulf States within the next 72 hours. After that, the true deluge begins. Iranian Shia have now “looted” US Intelligence files in the sack of the airbase. Further, the “crashing” drones are giving Iran a chance to understand our entire drone technology. And finally, the House of Saud is now massing, or “building up” military forces on its border with Yemen.

http://news.yahoo.com/exclusive-saudi-arabia-moving-military-equipment-near-yemen-232344147.html

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/how-crashing-drones-are-exposing-secrets-about-us-war-operations/2015/03/24/e89ed940-d197-11e4-8fce-3941fc548f1c_story.html?hpid=z1

http://www.latimes.com/world/middleeast/la-fg-us-intelligence-yemen-20150325-story.html#page=1

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/26/world/middleeast/al-anad-air-base-houthis-yemen.html?_r=0

http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/M/ML_YEMEN?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2015-03-25-12-20-57
Mar 25, 1:15 PM EDT

Yemen’s president flees country by sea amid rebel advance

By AHMED AL-HAJ
Associated Press
AP Photo
AP Photo/Hani Mohammed

Latest News
Saudis, Egypt consider intervention in Yemen, likely by air

Yemen’s president flees country by sea amid rebel advance

NEWS GUIDE: The crisis in Yemen as president flees Aden home

In south Yemen, a militia leader is president’s top ally

Aden: Refuge of Yemen’s president and target of his enemies

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SANAA, Yemen (AP) — Yemeni President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi fled the country by sea Wednesday on a boat from Aden, as Shiite rebels and their allies advanced on the southern port city where he had taken refuge, captured his defense minister and seized the city’s airport.

Hadi’s departure marks a dramatic turn in Yemen’s turmoil and means a decisive collapse of what was left of his rule, which the United States and Gulf allies had hoped could stabilize the chronically chaotic nation and fight al-Qaida’s branch here after the 2011 ouster of longtime autocrat Ali Abdullah Saleh.

Over the past year, the Shiite rebels known as Houthis, who are believed to be supported by Iran, have battled their way out of their northern strongholds, overwhelmed the capital, Sanaa, seized province after province in the north and worked their way south. Their advance has been boosted by units of the military and security forces that remained loyal to Saleh, who allied with the rebels.

With Hadi gone, there remains resistance to the Houthis scattered around the country, whether from Sunni tribesmen, local militias, pro-Hadi military units or al-Qaida fighters.

Hadi and his aides left Aden after 3:30 p.m. on two boats, security and port officials told The Associated Press. The officials would not specify his destination. But Hadi is scheduled to attend an Arab summit in Egypt on the weekend, where Arab allies are scheduled to discuss formation of a joint Arab force that could pave the way for military intervention against Houthis.

His flight came after Houthis and Saleh loyalists advanced against Hadi’s allies on multiple fronts. Military officials said militias and military units loyal to Hadi had “fragmented,” speeding the rebel advance. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to reporters

Earlier in the day, the rebels seized a key air base where U.S. troops and Europeans had advised the country in its fight against al-Qaida militants. The base is only 60 kilometers (35 miles) away from Aden.

In the province of Lahj, adjoining Aden, the rebels captured Hadi’s defense minister, Maj. Gen. Mahmoud al-Subaihi, and his top aide on Wednesday and subsequently transferred them to the capital, Sanaa. Yemen’s state TV, controlled by the Houthis, announced a bounty of nearly $100,000 for Hadi’s capture.

Hadi then fled his presidential palace, and soon after warplanes targeted presidential forces guarding it. No casualties were reported. By midday, Aden’s airport fell into hands of Saleh’s forces after intense clashes with pro-Hadi militias.

Aden was tense Wednesday, with schools, government offices, shops and restaurants largely closed. Inside the few remaining opened cafes, men watched the news on television. With the fall of the city appearing imminent, looters went through two abandoned army camps, one in Aden and the other nearby, taking weapons and ammunition.

The takeover of Aden, the country’s economic hub, would mark the collapse of what is left of Hadi’s grip on power. After the Houthis overran Sanaa in September, he had remained in office, but then was put under house arrest. He fled the capital earlier in March with remnants of his government and declared Aden his temporarty capital.

Yemen’s Foreign Minister Riad Yassin told Dubai-based Al-Arabiya TV satellite news network that he officially made a request to the Arab League on Wednesday to send a military force to intervene against the Houthis. Depicting the Houthis as a proxy of Shiite Iran, a rival to Sunni Gulf countries, he warned of an Iranian “takeover” of Yemen. The Houthis deny they are backed by Iran.

Mohammed Abdel-Salam, a spokesman for the Houthis, said their forces were not aiming to “occupy” the south. “They will be in Aden in few hours,” Abdel-Salam told the rebels’ satellite Al-Masirah news channel.

Earlier, Al-Masirah reported that the Houthis and allied fighters had “secured” the al-Annad air base, the country’s largest. It claimed the base had been looted by both al-Qaida fighters and troops loyal to Hadi.

The U.S. recently evacuated some 100 soldiers, including Special Forces commandos, from the base after al-Qaida briefly seized a nearby city. Britain also evacuated soldiers.

The base was crucial in the U.S. drone campaign against Al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, which Washington considers to be the most dangerous offshoot of the terror group. And American and European military advisers there also assisted Hadi’s government in its fight against al-Qaida’s branch, which holds territory in eastern Yemen and has claimed the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris.

U.S. operations against the militants have been scaled back dramatically amid Yemen’s chaos. U.S. officials have said CIA drone strikes will continue in the country, though there will be fewer of them. The agency’s ability to collect intelligence on the ground in Yemen, while not completely gone, is also much diminished.

The Houthis, in the aftermath of massive suicide bombings in Sanaa last week that killed at least 137 people, ordered a general mobilization and their leader, Abdel-Malik al-Houthi, vowed to send his forces to the south to fight al-Qaida and militant groups.

In Sanaa, dozens of coffins were lined up for a mass funeral of the victims Wednesday. Among the victims was a top Shiite cleric. Yemen’s Islamic State-linked militants have claimed responsibility for the attack.

The Houthis seized the capital, Sanaa, in September and have since been advancing south along with Saleh’s loyalists. On Tuesday, they fired bullets and tear gas to disperse thousands of protesters in the city of Taiz, known as the gateway to southern Yemen. Six demonstrators were killed and scores more were wounded, officials said.

The Houthis also battled militias loyal to Hadi in the city of al-Dhalea, adjacent to Taiz, Yemen’s third-largest city. Taiz is also the birthplace of its 2011 Arab Spring-inspired uprising that forced Saleh to hand over power to Hadi in a deal brokered by the U.N. and Gulf countries.

Hadi on Tuesday asked the U.N. Security Council to authorize a military intervention “to protect Yemen and to deter the Houthi aggression” in Aden and the rest of the south. In his letter, Hadi said he also has asked members of the six-nation Gulf Cooperation Council and the Arab League for immediate help.

Saudi Arabia warned that “if the Houthi coup does not end peacefully, we will take the necessary measures for this crisis to protect the region.”

Associated Press writer Maggie Michael in Cairo contributed to this report.

© 2015 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Learn more about our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

YEMEN CIVIL WAR HAS NOW OFFICIALLY STARTED. HOUTHI DECLAR JIHAD ON SUNNIS

Key points are:

One: ISIS just murdered over 120 Shia at prayers on Friday.
Two. Iran just shipped in 185 TONS OF MILITARY SUPPLIES TO THE PORT CONTROLLED BY THE HOUTHI.
Three: Houthi just fully mobilized, AND DECLARED JIHAD IN YEMEN AGAINST THE SUNNIS.
Four: Houthis are now fully supported by Iran, fully being trained by Revolutionary Guard troops and now openly deploying in the capital city for the sole purpose of dealing with Sunni “radicals.” The Houhi are going to kill every single Sunni, or force them to flee for their lives to South Yemen.
Five. Al Quaida of the Arabian Peninsula denied they took part in the murder of those 120 Shia, and also took full operational control of that southern Yemen city.

SIX. EVERY SINGLE PIECE, AND EVERY SINGLE PLAYER IS NOW READY TO BEGIN A LARGE SCALE CIVIL WAR IN YEMEN BASED ON SHIA/SUNNI, TRIBAL AND PROXY WAR STATUS.

One more thing, the Gulf states has just said they will now deploy fully armed naval units to prevent any more Iranian ships from off loading 185 tons of military stuff in the future.

WE ARE NOW IN THE EARLY PHASES OF A GENERAL, REGIONAL MIDDLE EAST WAR THAT WILL START WITH ISIS/SHIA/IRAN YEMEN AND IRAQ.

If any of the Gulf State Naval Units actually fire on any Iranian freighter trying to unload in Yemen, IRAN WILL LAUNCH A MISSILE AT DUBAI AND LEVEL ONE OF THOSE SKYSCRAPERS.

We are right on the edge and ISIS has just pulled the grenade pin in Yemen.

YEMEN SLIDES TOWARDS TOTAL PROXY WAR 3-20-2015

I have been commenting on Iran’s takeover of Yemen for quite some time. The Mosque Massacre is nothing new in the centuries long war between Shia and Sunni Muslims. It does open another war front in Yemen that will be fully exploited by Iran. We can be sure of that. Iran is clearly making the final moves in its long planned end game. Iran is now fully deployed into Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, and Yemen. It is also making some moves into South America nobody has said much about.

Here are the links to the two threads over at timebomb2000 along with my comments.

http://www.timebomb2000.com/vb/showthread.php?462569-IRAN-MOVES-TO-CONTROL-SUEZ-CANAL-AND-YEMEN-1-21-2015

http://www.timebomb2000.com/vb/showthread.php?465609-Dozens-dead-in-twin-suicide-attacks-in-Yemen-as-fighting-between-Muslim-groups-%28Now-120-%29

I have been discussing Iranian power moves in Yemen on the other thread for some time now. Here is why this current attack happened.

Several days ago an “ISIS leader” made a very hostile statement regarding the Shia in Yemen and exhorting the Sunni to attack them. This is the result. In addition, it is Iranian Shia Militias that are currently KICKING THE LIVING FECAL MATERIAL OUT OF ISIS TROOPS IN TIKRIT AND IRAQ. This Yemen attack is also in response to this ongoing butt kicking in Iraq. ISIS is both showing its vigor and weakness by using suicide attacks in Yemen. Suicide attacks are, at least to me by definition, an indication you don’t have robust combat abilities.

Now here is what is going to happen as a result of this open attack by ISIS/Sunni on the Shia in Yemen.

One: Iran has full operational combat ability in Yemen with the Houthi Militia. The Shia Militias are now going to be turned loose, lock and loaded, shoot on sight and KILL ANY SUNNI THEY CAN GET THEIR HANDS ON. Ergo, if there are more of these “we don’t want the Shia” demonstrations, they will be machine gunned into puddles of blood.
Two: Iran will now move openly to CRUSH THE SUNNI VARIANT AL QUAIDA OF THE ARABIAN PENINSULA. THEY WILL ALSO MOVE ON THE SUNNI ISIS AND THEIR CALIPHATE ANYWHERE THEY CAN KILL THEM.
Third: The fool of a former President, the one the USA likes, is going to be hunted down and executed by everybody else because he attacked that air base in Aden. Or had his guy attack that airbase, or whatever. It is really hard to tell who is attacking whom, for what reason, and especially what the results will be in a place like Yemen. I have to admit there have been times I felt like just rolling some marbles and predicting what would happen that way.

Yemen is now fully in Play, gang. Iran is going to pour in even more Revolutionary Guards, more piles and piles of military supply to make sure its Proxy, the Houthi, Shia tribal militia have everything they need for a true war of Sunni extermination in Yemen. If you keep track of things, like I do, you will remember the tiny statement Iran would “resume” air freighter and passenger service from Iran to Yemen recently. Well, they are bringing in a minimum of one cargo plane full of Revolutionary Guard troops or military supplies per day. The Houthi certainly have the firepower to butcher every single Sunni now living in the areas of Yemen they don’t currently control. It is now genocide time in Yemen.

Yemen is now in play as viewed in the context of Iraq being overwhelmed by Iranian Shia Militias, Syria becoming western Iran, Southern Lebanon with Hezzbollah, and now Yemen. If you throw in Israel’s election, all the right parts are now coming together for a regional war similar to the 1973s Yom Kippur. This was the one I was in the US Army during.

We are on the verge of a total Iranian combat deployment designed to take over the Middle East from Yemen, Lebanon, Syria and Iraq to Iran. Iran is no longer screwing around. The massacre of 140 plus Shia at the Mosque by ISIS is going to unleash the Houthi militias in the kind of Sunni slaughtering bloodbaths in Yemen we have seen in Iraq.

I will also note the many credible reports of IRANIAN SHIA MILITIAS KILLING SUNNIS, OR DAMAGING THEIR PROPERTY, IN THE SO CALLED “LIBERATION” OF TIKRIT IN IRAQ. The Sunni in Iraq are now trapped between the ISIS thugs, Shia Militias looking to kill them, or the Kurds. The Central government of Iraq is now fully Shia and looking to kick all the Sunni out of Iraq they can. Yep, we sure won that war now didn’t we?

The Middle East is all about religion and it always has been. We are going to see a Shia/Iran JIHAD IN YEMEN. IT WILL END WHEN THE OTHER 40 PERCENT OF THE NON SHIA POPULATION ARE NO LONGER A FACTOR IN YEMEN.

Doomer Doug, a.k.a. Doug McIntosh now has a blog at www.doomerdoug.wordpress.com
My end of the world e book “Day of the Dogs” will soon be available for sale at smashwords. The url is
https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/267340 It is also at the following url
http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B007BRLFYU

LIFE UNDER MILITANT ISLAM’S ISIS 3-16-2015

This is an unflinching look at exactly what Militant Islam plans for ALL western nations if it really does come to power in the USA, Britain, or Continental Europe. Doomer Doug has warned you repeatedly of what Militant Islam, Sunni or Shia, really wants to do with all us so called “Infidels.” It is not correct to say all Muslims want to put people in cages and burn them to death like ISIS does. It is correct to say either Muslims, the non Militant, psycho ones, get their act together or else. While it is hard to believe now, Western nations are going to eventually get their acts together and religiously cleanse  nations of all Muslims. Muslims simply can’t expect to not be held accountable for the actions of Militant Islam if, for instance, ISIS really does burn the White House to ground. Bottom line, no American administration would live through that politically. Further, the dominant radical leftist multicultural, PC based thought mindset would vaporize. It would be replaced by the kind of FASCIST GOVERNMENT NEEDED TO SECURE THE PHYSICAL SECURITY OF THE AMERICAN PEOPLE. Now, if you don’t get that then you just don’t understand the entire point of the populist, “right wing,” Tea Party movement is to prevent the system failure that will result in a fascist government being accepted.

Doomer Doug, a.k.a. Doug McIntosh now has a blog at www.doomerdoug.wordpress.com
My end of the world e book “Day of the Dogs” will soon be available for sale at smashwords. The url is
https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/267340 It is also at the following url
http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B007BRLFYU

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/middle-east/life-under-isis-the-everyday-reality-of-living-in-the-islamic-caliphate-with-its-7th-century-laws-very-modern-methods-and-merciless-violence-10109655.html

Life under Isis: The everyday reality of living in the Islamic ‘Caliphate’ with its 7th Century laws, very modern methods and merciless violence

Inside the ‘Islamic State’ – part one: Patrick Cockburn today begins a groundbreaking week-long series of dispatches which will explore the creation of this so-called Islamic State, what it’s like to live under the jihadis’ rule, and what if anything the West can do about it. Today, he talks to people living in the ‘caliphate’ to find out how they regard Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi’s merciless but powerful new state and how it treats them

It is one of the strangest states ever created. The Islamic State wants to force all humanity to believe in its vision of a religious and social utopia existing in the first days of Islam. Women are to be treated as chattels, forbidden to leave the house unless they are accompanied by a male relative. People deemed to be pagans, like the Yazidis, can be bought and sold as slaves. Punishments such as beheadings, amputations and flogging become the norm. All those not pledging allegiance to the caliphate declared by its leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, on 29 June last year are considered enemies.

The rest of the world has watched with fascinated horror over the past eight months as Isis, which calls itself Islamic State, imposed its rule over a vast area in northern Iraq and eastern Syria inhabited by six million people. Highly publicised atrocities or acts of destruction, such as burning to death a Jordanian pilot, decapitating prisoners and destroying the remains of ancient cities, are deliberately staged as demonstrations of strength and acts of defiance. For a movement whose tenets are supposedly drawn from the religious norms of the 7th century CE, Isis has a very modern and manipulative approach to dominating the news agenda by means of attention-grabbing PR stunts in which merciless violence plays a central role.

These are not the acts of a weird but beleaguered cult, but of a powerful state and war machine. In swift succession last year, its fighters inflicted defeats on the Iraqi army, the Iraqi Kurdish Peshmerga, the Syrian army and Syrian rebels. They staged a 134-day siege of the Syrian-Kurdish city of Kobani and withstood 700 US air strikes targeting the small urban area where they were concentrated before finally being forced to pull back. The caliphate’s opponents deny it is a real state, but it is surprisingly well organised, capable of raising taxes, imposing conscription and even controlling rents.

Iraqi Yazidi women waiting at a checkpoint in Kirkuk after their release by the Isis militant group Iraqi Yazidi women waiting at a checkpoint in Kirkuk after their release by the Isis militant group
Isis may be regarded with appalled fascination by most people, but conditions inside its territory remain a frightening mystery to the outside world. This is scarcely surprising, because it imprisons and frequently murders local and foreign journalists who report on its activities. Despite these difficulties, The Independent has tried to build up a complete picture of what life is like inside the Islamic State by interviewing people who have recently lived in Sunni Arab cities like Mosul and Fallujah that are held – or, in the case of Ramadi, the capital of Anbar province, 80 per cent held – by Isis.

Christians, Yazidis, Shabak and Shia, persecuted by Isis as heretics or idolaters, fled or were killed last year, so almost all of those interviewed are Sunni Arabs living in Iraq, with the exception of some Kurds still living in Mosul.

The aim of the investigation is to find out what it is like to live in the Islamic State. A great range of questions need to be answered. Do people support, oppose or have mixed feelings about Isis rule and, if so, why? What is it like to live in a place where a wife appearing on the street without the niqab, a cloth covering the head and face, will be told to fetch her husband, who will then be given 40 lashes? How do foreign fighters behave? What is the reaction of local people to demands by Isis that unmarried women should wed its fighters?  More prosaically, what do people eat, drink and cook, and how do they obtain electricity? The answers to these and many other questions show instances of savage brutality, but also a picture of the Islamic State battling to provide some basic services and food at low prices.


A point to emphasise is that none of those interviewed, even those who detest it, expect Isis to go out of business soon, although it is coming under increasingly effective pressure from its many enemies. These include the US, Iran, the Iraqi army, Shia militias, Iraqi Kurdish Peshmerga, Syrian Kurds and the Syrian army, to name only the main protagonists. Anti-Isis forces are beginning to win significant victories on the battlefield and the odds are heavily stacked against the Islamic State. Over the past week some 20,000 Shia militiamen, 3,000 Iraqi security forces, 200 defence ministry commandos and 1,000 Sunni tribesmen have been fighting their way into Tikrit, Saddam Hussein’s home town.

“The numbers are overwhelming,” said General Martin Dempsey, Chairman of the US Joint Chiefs of Staff, claiming that there are only “hundreds” of Isis fighters pitted against this massive pro-government force, although other reports suggest it may be closer to 1,000.

The fall of Tikrit would be a serious reverse for the Islamic State, though it is easy to exaggerate its impact. Isis claims that its victories are divinely inspired, but it has never felt duty-bound to fight to the last man and bullet for its every stronghold. It describes its strategy of fluid manoeuvre as “moving like a serpent between the rocks”. Long a purely guerrilla force, it is at its most effective when it launches unexpected attacks using a deadly cocktail of well-tried tactics such suicide bombers, IEDs and snipers. These are accompanied by well-made films of atrocities broadcast over the internet and social media, directed at frightening and demoralising its enemies.

Isis may be retreating, but it can afford to do so, since last year it seized an area larger than Great Britain. Its strength is not just military or geographical but political – and this is a point raised by many of those interviewed. The dislike and fear that many Sunni Arabs feel for Isis is balanced and often outweighed by similar feelings towards Iraqi government forces. At the heart of the problem is the fact that last year Isis seized the leadership of the Sunni Arab communities in Iraq and Syria through its military victories.

So far no credible Sunni alternative to Isis has emerged. An assault by Iraqi government, Shia militia or Kurdish Peshmerga on Mosul would probably be resisted by the Sunni Arabs as an attack on their community as a whole.

An Isis propaganda video purporting to show fighters near the Iraqi city of Tikrit An Isis propaganda video purporting to show fighters near the Iraqi city of Tikrit
“The Kurds cannot fight for Mosul alone because they are not Arabs,” says Fuad Hussein, chief of staff of Kurdish President Massoud Barzani. “And I don’t think the Shia militias would be willing to fight there; and in any case, local people would not accept them.”

If no alternative to Isis emerges for the Sunni to rally to, then all the six million or so Sunni Arabs in Iraq may be targeted as Isis supporters, regardless of their real sympathies. In the long term, Isis could turn out to be the gravedigger of the Sunni Arabs in Iraq, where they are 20 per cent of the population, by stoking the hostility of the other 80 per cent of Iraqis, who are Shia or Kurds.

The Islamic State was declared in the weeks after the capture of Mosul, Iraq’s second city, by Isis on 10 June 2014. It was only then that countries around the world began to wake up to the fact that Isis posed a serious threat to them all. Reorganised under Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi in 2010 after the death of the previous leader, Isis took advantage of the Syrian uprising of 2011 to expand its forces and resume widespread guerrilla warfare. Sunni protests against mounting repression by the Baghdad government transmuted into armed resistance. In the first half of 2014 Isis defeated five Iraqi divisions, a third of the Iraqi army, to take over most of the giant Anbar province. A crucial success came when Isis-led forces seized the city of Fallujah, 40 miles west of Baghdad, on 3 January 2014 and the Iraqi army failed to win it back. This was the first time that Isis had ruled a large population centre and it is important to understand how it behaved and how and why this behaviour became more extreme as Isis consolidated its authority. The stories of two men, Abbas (generally known as Abu Mohammed) and Omar Abu Ali, who come from the militant Sunni strongholds of Fallujah and the nearby town of al-Karmah, explain graphically what happened during those first crucial months when Isis was in power.

Abbas is a 53-year-old Sunni farmer from Fallujah. He recalls the joyous day when Isis first entered the city: “At the beginning… we were so happy and called it ‘the Islamic Conquest’. Most of the people were offering them feasts and warmly welcoming their chief fighters.”

A gunman makes a radio call in rebel-held Fallujah, just west of Baghdad in Iraq. A gunman makes a radio call in rebel-held Fallujah, just west of Baghdad in Iraq.
Isis told people in Fallujah that it had come to set up an Islamic state, and at first this was not too onerous. A Sharia Board of Authority was established to resolve local problems. Abbas says that “everything was going well until Isis also took Mosul. Then restrictions on our people increased. At the mosques, local imams started to be replaced by people from other Arab states or Afghanistan. During the first six months of Isis rule, the movement had encouraged people to go to the mosque, but after the capture of Mosul it became obligatory and anybody who violated the rule received 40 lashes.” A committee of community leaders protested to Isis and received an interesting reply: “The answer was that, even at the time of the Prophet Mohamed, laws were not strict at the beginning and alcoholic drinks were allowed in the first three years of Islamic rule.” Only after Islamic rule had become strongly entrenched were stricter rules enforced. So it had been in the 7th century and so it would be 1,400 years later in Fallujah.

Abbas, a conservative-minded community leader with two sons and three daughters in Fallujah, said he had no desire to leave the city because all his extended family were there, though daily life was tough and getting tougher. As of this February, “people suffer from lack of water and electricity which they get from generators because the public supply only operates three to five hours every two days”. The price of cooking gas has soared to the equivalent of £50 a cylinder, so people have started to use wood for cooking. Communications are difficult because Isis blew up the mast for mobile phones six months ago, but “some civilians have managed to get satellite internet lines”.

However, it was not harsh living conditions but two issues affecting his children that led Abbas to leave Fallujah hurriedly on 2 January this year. The first reason for flight was a new conscription law under which every family had to send one of their sons to be an Isis fighter. Abbas did not want his son Mohamed to be called up. (Previously, families could avoid conscription by paying a heavy fine but at the start of this year military service in Isis-held areas became obligatory.)

A convoy of vehicles carrying Isis militants in Fallujah A convoy of vehicles carrying Isis militants in Fallujah
The second concerned one of Abbas’s daughters. He says that one day “a foreign fighter on the bazaar checkpoint followed my daughter, who was shopping with her mother, until they reached home. He knocked on the door and asked to meet the head of the house. I welcomed him and asked, ‘How I can help you?’ He said he wanted to ask for my daughter’s hand. I refused his request because it is the custom of our tribe that we cannot give our daughters in marriage to strangers. He was shocked by my answer and later attempted to harass my girls many times. I saw it was better to leave.” Abbas is now in the Kurdistan Regional Government area with his family. He regrets that Isis did not stick with its original moderate and popular policy before the capture of Mosul, after which it started to impose rules not mentioned in sharia. Abbas says that “we need Isis to save us from the government but that doesn’t mean that we completely support them”. He recalls how Isis prohibited cigarettes and hubble-bubble pipes because they might distract people from prayer, in addition to banning Western-style haircuts, T-shirts with English writing on them or images of women. Women are not allowed to leave home unaccompanied by a male relative. Abbas says that “all this shocked us and made us leave the city”.

Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the caliph of the self-proclaimed Islamic State Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the caliph of the self-proclaimed Islamic State
A more cynical view is held by Omar Abu Ali, a 45-year-old Sunni Arab farmer from al-Karmah (also called Garma) 10 miles north-east of Fallujah. He has two sons and three daughters and he says that, when Isis took over their town last year, “my sons welcomed the rebels, but I wasn’t that optimistic”. The arrival of Isis did not improve the dire living conditions in al-Kharmah and he didn’t take too seriously the propaganda about how “the soldiers of Allah would defeat [Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-] Maliki’s devils”. Still, he agrees that many people in his town were convinced by this, though his experience was that Saddam Hussein, Maliki or Isis were equally bad for the people of al-Kharmah: “They turn our town into a battlefield and we are the only losers.”

Al-Kharmah is close to the front line with Baghdad and endures conditions of semi-siege in which few supplies can get through. A litre of petrol costs £2.70 and a bag of flour more than £65. Omar tried to buy as much bread as he could store to last his family a week or more “because even the bakeries were suffering from lack of flour”. There was constant bombardment and in February the last water purification plant in town was hit, though he is not clear if this was done by artillery or US air strikes: “The town is now in a horrible situation because of lack of water.”

Displaced Iraqi Christians settle at St. Joseph Church in Irbil, northern Iraq Displaced Iraqi Christians settle at St. Joseph Church in Irbil, northern Iraq
Omar spent five months working for Isis, though it is not clear in what capacity, his main purpose being to prevent the conscription of his two sons aged 14 and 16. Rockets and artillery shells rained down on al-Karmah, though Omar says they seldom hit Isis fighters because they hid in civilian houses or in schools. “The day I left a school was hit and many children were killed,” he recalls.

He says US air strikes and Iraqi army artillery “kill us along with Isis fighters. There is no difference between what they do and the mass killings by Isis.” Omar had been trying to flee for two months but did not have the money until he managed to sell his furniture. He is now staying outside Irbil, the Kurdish capital, where his sons and daughters work on local farms which “is at least better than staying in al-Kharmah”.

He says the Americans, Iraqi government and Isis have all brought disaster and lists the wars that have engulfed his home town in the past 10 years. “All of them are killing us,” he says. “We have no friends.”

WE HAVE ALL BEEN FUKUSHIMED 3-11-2011 TO 3-11-2014

WE HAVE ALL BEEN FUKUSHIMED

3-11-2011 TO 3-11-2015

In honor of General Electric and Tokyo Electric radiating us for four years, I write this song. I think I listened to too much Tom Lehrer when I was a teenager.

Doomer Doug, a.k.a. Doug McIntosh now has a blog at www.doomerdoug.wordpress.com
My end of the world e book “Day of the Dogs” will soon be available for sale at smashwords. The url is
https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/267340 It is also at the following url
http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B007BRLFYU

Four years ago the tsunami hit,

Four years ago the spinning blade was hit,

Four years ago the reactor cores melted down.

We have all been fuked,

I have been fuked,
You have all been Fukushimed,

And now we all will die.

Fema man hand me the jar;

Don’t make me go far,

Or cause me to miss,

When you test my radioactive, toxic piss.

I got Plutonium in my lung;

FEMA man why did my kids die so young,

It drove me quite insane,

Or maybe it was Plutonium on the brain.

We have all been fuked,

I have been fuked,

You have all been Fukushimed,

And now we will all die.

How we mocked and scoffed,

At least until we started to cough.

We believed the government and media,

When they lied and lied,

At least until everything died.

We have no salmon, whales or birds anymore,

We believed the corporate media whores,

They told us the mass Pacific die offs were no big deal,

At least until we couldn’t find our next meal.

We cried and cried,

Once we figured out our leaders lied and lied

FEMA and the 1 percent into their bunkers fled,

Where they watched child porn videos until we all were dead.

We have all been fuked,

I have been fuked,

We have all been Fukushimed,

And now we will all die.

ODDS AND ENDS 3-4-2015

One of the things I try to do here on my blog is keep track of what is really happening. I include environmental aspects of modern life on the grounds all seven plus billion humans have made a mess indeed. The four year anniversary of Fukushima is March 11th, 2015. The mainstream press, even without Net Neutrality, is censoring any mention of this extinction level event from the global media. Once Net Neutrality is fully implemented, soon, real soon now, any mention will vanish. The following link and story shows why the powers that be are so nervous. The short version is the entire Pacific food chain, all the stuff we humans eat, is now full of toxic radiation.

http://enenews.com/report-fallout-japan-reactors-detected-freshwater-fish-radioactive-dose-equivalent-fish-caught-100-miles-fukushima-reactors-ongoing-measurements-needed-along-predicted-plume-trajectory

Next, we have in the Karma category the fact the poor fool who gave our Cretin-in-Chief Obama the Nobel Peace Prize has been sacked. It may be due to the simple fact Obama has been more of a warmonger than Bush ever was. It may also be due to Obama’s enthusiastic use of Drones carrying Hellfire, and what an apt name for the US missiles this is, to blow up innocent people. Obama claims he actually gets a few “terrorists” among the large numbers of women and children he blows up. I find it increasingly interesting that some of the most accurate, timely, and truthful information comes from Russia Times, even though Putin the thug is in charge of Russia.

http://rt.com/news/237465-nobel-peace-chairman-deposed/

Moving on, we come to the category called “The world is still an amazing place,” category. The link for that is here.

http://news-beta.nationalgeographic.com/2015/03/150302-honduras-lost-city-monkey-god-maya-ancient-archaeology/?

It appears the Maya were not alone. They had neighbors who vanished into the jungles of Central America also. One of their cities has now been found deep in the jungle. I found this story truly amazing and think you should read it. If nothing else, it will take your mind off the end of the world status we are now.

The following is page 5 of a thread I started over at timebomb2000.com on Iran and Yemen. The give and take shows why I love the Internet. I am archiving it here before Net Neutrality censors exchanges like this. If you get any value from this blog, then buy my e-books on Amazon. The info is in the about section, or on the end of my posts below. I also have a paypal account if you would like to make a donation. I am having severe financial issues to put it mildly.

  1. Housecarl is online now Has No Life – Lives on TB

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    For links see article source…..
    Posted for fair use…..
    http://www.latimes.com/world/middlee…ry.html#page=1

    Yemen port city of Aden seethes with separatist fervor

    By Patrick J. McDonnell and Nabih Bulos contact the reporter
    February 22, 2015 | Reporting from Aden, Yemen

    A replica Big Ben still looks down on the harbor. Queen Victoria casts a dour gaze from her bronzed throne in a patch of green fronting the port.

    But this one-time jewel of the British Empire has fallen onto hard times — and now seethes with sedition as Yemen lurches toward civil war and possible disintegration.

    The return this weekend of ousted President Abdu Rabu Mansour Hadi, a southerner, after weeks of house arrest in the capital, Sana, has done little to quell separatist furor here in the south.

    Blue-tinged flags of an erstwhile new independent nation are ubiquitous. Gaggles of pro-independence protesters march on the streets. Separatist slogans line the walls. Talk of rebellion is rampant.

    “If there is no secession, then this area will become the biggest conflict in the Middle East — bigger than Iraq or Syria,” warned Mohammad Nasser Hattab, who heads a “popular committee” militia that has commandeered a police station across from the tattered park where a stolid and plump Victoria still observes the horizon.

    “The situation has gotten to the point that it is us or them on this land,” said Nasser, amid nods of agreement from fellow militiamen with Kalashnikovs and checkered head scarves gathered on the second floor of a dingy police precinct office in the port-side Tawahi district, known as Steamer Point during British rule.

    This fractured nation of 26 million, the poorest in the Arab world, has many hot spots in the aftermath of the fall of the capital, Sana, to the northern-based Houthi faction, a mostly Shiite Muslim group in a largely Sunni Muslim nation. The Houthis overran the capital in September and consolidated control in recent weeks, placing Hadi and others in his administration under house arrest and dissolving parliament.

    The emergence of the Houthis, an ally of Iran, threatens to turn Yemen into yet another geopolitical battleground with profound implications for U.S. policy. The nation has until now been relatively free of the sectarian-fueled violence that has ravaged Iraq and Syria.

    Fostering stability here has been a major goal of the Obama administration, which has touted Yemen as a success of its counter-terrorism strategy. The nation is home to Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, regarded as among the most potent of the global terrorist network’s branches. U.S. drone strikes continue to hit Al Qaeda targets in Yemen, despite the Houthi takeover.

    The port of Aden, still bustling but much depleted since its colonial-era days as one of the world’s busiest harbors, was the site of a signature Al Qaeda attack: The 2000 strike on the U.S. destroyer Cole that left 17 U.S. service members dead and 39 wounded.

    The Houthis have vowed to destroy Al Qaeda, a Sunni group that has repeatedly targeted them. But others argue that the Houthi advance has become an Al Qaeda recruiting bonanza, drawing in Sunni youth and tribesmen.

    “Many tribes had abandoned Al Qaeda, but the arrival of the Houthis in Sana pushed the tribes back to Al Qaeda,” Aden Gov. Abdul Aziz bin Habtoor said in an interview here.

    To the east of Sana, Sunni Arab tribes, some allied with Al Qaeda, are arming against a possible Houthi thrust into resource-rich Marib province, source of much of the nation’s oil and gas and its major energy infrastructure. Sunni tribal leaders, reportedly receiving aid from Saudi Arabia, Yemen’s wary northern neighbor, have vowed to resist.

    Meanwhile, the central government in Sana appears to have lost much of its control over the south.

    Northern and southern Yemen were two countries until merging in 1990, but tensions between the two distinct regions never completely dissipated. Now, the nation’s political turmoil has given a renewed boost to the secessionist agenda.

    The Houthis have relatively little support in the south. There is widespread disdain for what southerners call a Houthi power grab — though the Houthis insist that their goal is a democratic, united state in which all regions are represented.

    Hadi, a former general, as well as a former vice president under longtime strongman Ali Abdullah Saleh, fled from house arrest and arrived in Aden on Saturday.

    Many here were outraged that Hadi did not embrace secession upon his return. Instead, he pledged to work toward a political settlement to maintain a unified Yemen — the goal of United Nations-brokered talks.

    “The situation is very dangerous now,” said Mohsen Mohammed bin Farid, who heads a coalition seeking to create “South Arabia” among eight southern provinces. “The people of the south were hoping that Hadi would be with us, be with independence.”

    Although Hadi has many supporters here, street protesters greeted his statement of unity with the chant: “Hadi, you are contemptible, the blood of the sons of the south is not cheap.”

    So-called popular committee militiamen, on the payroll of political factions and tribes, have set up checkpoints and usurped the security services in parts of the south, including Aden. They bristle with indignation at the idea of Houthi-led rule.

    “They [the Houthis] do not represent a Yemeni point of view,” said Nasser, the popular committee commander near the port, in an apparent reference to the Houthis’ links to Iran. “They are influenced by external dictates.”

    The future role of Hadi, backed by the United States and its Persian Gulf allies, remains a question mark. Hadi appears to have rescinded his resignation from the presidency — tendered Jan. 22 while he was under house arrest — and signaled that he favors continued dialogue among all of Yemen’s factions to keep the nation intact. His allies insist that most southerners prefer to remain part of Yemen.

    “The great majority of people in the south support the idea of unity and adhere to the concept of a federal state,” said Bin Habtoor, the Aden governor, who spoke Sunday after meeting with the president here.

    But Hadi insists that all appointments and government actions made since Sept. 21, when the Houthis overran Sana, are null and void. The governor also said talks should be moved from Houthi-controlled Sana to Aden.

    “The Houthi forcibly seized power with the gun and he must relinquish power whether he wants to or not,” said Bin Habtoor.

    In Sana, however, the Houthis have showed no sign of pulling back. With regional, sectarian and tribal tensions rising, the prospect for compromise appears to be narrowing.

    “What we see in Yemen is a potential humanitarian crisis, the prospect of economic collapse, and possible areas of conflict,” Jamal Benomar, the U.N. special envoy for Yemen, said in an interview in Sana. “The prospect for fragmentation is clearly there. We are saying that there is no other way but for all the political parties to come together and make a deal sometime soon.”

    Bulos is a special correspondent. Special correspondent Zaid al-Alayaa in Aden contributed to this report.

    Copyright © 2015, Los Angeles Times

  2. #162

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    http://www.ibtimes.com/yemens-depose…upport-1825898

    Yemen’s Deposed President Hadi Withdraws Resignation, Gulf Countries Express Support
    By Aditya Tejas @Artejas a.tejas@ibtimes.com on February 24 2015 12:55 AM EST

    Former Yemeni president Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi officially withdrew his resignation from the presidency on Monday, local officials said, according to media reports. The move comes after Hadi gained the support of Arab Gulf states opposed to the ruling Shia Houthis.

    A member of the parliamentary assembly said that Hadi submitted a letter to them withdrawing the resignation he had tendered in January, after the Houthis took control of government, Al Jazeera reported. He has also been meeting with security advisors and loyalist governors in the city of Aden.

    Hadi had earlier said in a statement on Saturday that he was still the rightful president, Reuters reported.

    On Monday, the Gulf Cooperation Council, a regional alliance of six Gulf countries, including Saudi Arabia and Qatar, expressed their support for Hadi, CNN reported. The council had earlier urged the United Nations to consider adopting a resolution authorizing military force against the Houthis. The resolution, adopted by the Security Council last week, demands that the Houthis step down from power, but does not authorize the use of military force.

    Tens of thousands of protesters also took to the streets in cities across Yemen to demand the removal of Houthis.

    “The Houthis thought they could not be stopped, and it only took hours for them to fall in the eyes of the people. Yemen has a president and the people will stand with him to uproot the Houthi militants from Sanaa,” Ali Al-Saedi, a protester, told CNN.

    Yemen’s cabinet rejected a call from the Houthis to return as a caretaker government, spokesman Rajeh Badi told The Yemen Times on Monday. “The government does not care about decisions made by the Revolutionary Committee,” he said, referring to the interim government installed by the Houthis.

    Hadi had left the capital city of Sanaa on Saturday, after the Houthis released him following weeks of house arrest. He fled to the coastal city of Aden, where he is reportedly consolidating support from loyalist forces and preparing to leave the country to get medical aid.

    Tobias Ellwood, the U.K.’s Minister for the Middle East, issued a statement on Monday calling for the Houthis to release other government officials. “I welcome the news that President Hadi is no longer under house arrest,” he said. I now call for the immediate and safe release of Prime Minister Bahah, Cabinet Ministers and all individuals arbitrarily detained or under house arrest.”

    The Houthis have found themselves increasingly isolated by the international community after their takeover of the Yemeni government was widely denounced as a coup. Several governments, including the U.S., Britain, and Saudi Arabia, have withdrawn embassy staff from the country.

  3. #163

    Doomer Doug is online now Veteran Member

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    Tick. Tick. Tick.

    Doomer Doug, a.k.a. Doug McIntosh now has a blog at www.doomerdoug.wordpress.com
    My end of the world e book “Day of the Dogs” will soon be available for sale at smashwords. The url is
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  4. #164

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    http://in.reuters.com/article/2015/0…0LT0RJ20150225

    Yemen Houthis take over U.S.-trained special forces base in Sanaa

    By Mohammed Ghobari
    SANAA Wed Feb 25, 2015 2:47pm IST

    (Reuters) – Armed men from Yemen’s newly dominant Houthi group took over a special forces army base in the capital Sanaa early on Wednesday, soldiers there said.

    The clashes, which lasted around six hours, started late on Tuesday when Houthis shelled the camp with heavy weapons, soldiers from the camp said. At least 10 people were killed.

    The troops had been trained and equipped by the United States as an elite counterterrorism unit during the rule of ex-president Ali Abullah Saleh, who was ousted by Arab Spring protests in 2011, military sources told Reuters.

    Houthi militiamen seized Sanaa in September, eventually leading President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi to flee to Aden this week where he seeks to set up a rival centre of power.

    For more than a decade the United States has watched with alarm as Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula – the most powerful arm of the global militant group – has grown in Yemen as the political chaos has mounted.

    The U.S. military trained and kitted out Yemeni soldiers under Saleh, and under Hadi the CIA has stepped up drone strikes aimed at killing suspected militants.

    U.S. officials have expressed concern that the rule of the resolutely anti-American Shi’ite Muslim Houthis will harm their counterterrorism efforts in a country that shares a long border with Saudi Arabia, the world’s oil exporter.

    Yemen’s Sunni Gulf neighbours have decried the Houthi takeover as a coup, and the head of the Gulf Cooperation Council Abdullatif al-Zayyani arrived in Aden to meet Hadi on Wednesday, political sources there said.

    The power struggle between the Houthis in Sanaa and Hadi in Aden casts more doubt on U.N.-sponsored talks to resolve Yemen’s crisis peacefully, and exacerbates sectarian and regional splits which may plunge the country into civil war.

    The Houthis said on Tuesday that Hadi had lost his legitimacy as head of state and was being sought as a fugitive from justice.

    (Additional reporting By Mohammed Mukhashaf and Noah Browning; Writing by Maha El Dahan; Editing by Alison Williams)

  5. #165

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    http://sputniknews.com/middleeast/20…018721857.html

    Yemen’s Houthi Group Seeks Russia’s Recognition
    © REUTERS/ Mohamed al-Sayaghi
    Middle East
    11:44 25.02.2015(updated 12:24 25.02.2015)

    Representatives of Yemen’s main opposition group Ansarullah, more commonly known as the Houthis, have met with Russian MPs in Moscow.

    Representatives from Yemen’s main opposition group Ansarullah, more commonly known as the Houthis, have met with Russian MPs in Moscow, Russian sources said.

    During the meeting, the Houthi delegation promised an array of lucrative contracts in exchange for Moscow’s recognition of the Ansarullah’s authority.

    The delegation assured that the Houthis will soon take control of oil-rich Marib Province, which they say will yield billions of dollars per day.

    In light of this, the delegation signaled its readiness to invite Russian companies to engage in oil production in the region. Also, the Houthis called for talks with Russia on bilateral cooperation in the agriculture sector, and already have a relevant business plan in the pipeline.

    The Moscow meeting came several days after Yemeni President Abdrabbuh Mansour Hadi said that he is withdrawing his resignation and resuming his duties, branding all measures adopted by the Houthis “null and illegitimate.”

    The security situation in Yemen was shaken after Hadi resigned last month following a takeover by a Shia militia group, the Houthis.

    This prompted several countries, including France, Germany, Italy, Britain and Spain, to close their diplomatic missions, withdraw staff and urge their nationals to leave Yemen.

    Meanwhile, the Russian side has said that it is proceeding from the principle of non-interference in Yemen’s internal affairs.

    At the same time, the Russian MPs expressed hope that the Houthi delegation’s visit to Moscow “will help launch a national dialogue in Yemen.”

    Several factions still divide Yemen’s territory; the Houthis dominate what was historically North Yemen, which united with formerly communist, Soviet-backed South Yemen in 1990. However, they are ideologically opposed to both America and Israel and are allegedly funded by Iran.

  6. #166

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    http://nation.com.pk/international/2…men-govt-kerry

    Iran ‘contributed’ to collapse of Yemen govt: Kerry
    February 25, 2015
    AFP

    WASHINGTON – Iran’s support for rebels in Yemen “contributed” to the militia’s takeover of the Yemeni capital and the collapse of the government, top US diplomat John Kerry said Tuesday.

    Speaking to US lawmakers, Kerry agreed Tehran’s support for the Huthi militia was “critical” in shoring up the rebels.

    Asked whether the Yemeni government collapsed because of Iran’s support for the Huthi, Kerry replied: “I think it contributed to it .. without any question whatsoever.”

    “But I do know that the Iranians were surprised by the events that took place and are hoping to see a national dialogue” take place,” Kerry told the Senate appropriations committee, at the start of two days of intense budget hearings.

    Kerry met Sunday and Monday in Geneva with his Iranian counterpart Mohammad Javad Zarif for talks on Tehran’s nuclear program, but acknowledged he had had “brief conversations” on other topics.

    Yemen’s Gulf neighbors have rejected the sidelining of the Western-backed President Abedrabbo Mansour Hadi as a “coup,” while the UN Security Council has urged the militia to withdraw its forces from government institutions.

    An aide to Hadi said Tuesday the embattled leader has retracted his resignation after escaping house arrest in the militia-controlled capital, Sanaa, at the weekend.

    Hadi had tendered his resignation last month after the Shiite militia seized the presidential palace and besieged his residence in Sanaa.

    Kerry revealed he planned to meet on Friday with leaders of the Gulf Cooperation Council in London to discuss the crisis in Yemen among other issues.

    The United States closed down its embassy in Yemen earlier this month, along with France and Britain, amid growing concerns about insecurity in the country.
    The Huthis, whose power base is in the mainly Shiite northern highlands, overran Sanaa unopposed five months ago.

    They have pushed their advance south and west into mainly Sunni areas, where they have met with fierce resistance from tribesmen and Yemen’s powerful branch of Al-Qaeda.

  7. #167

    Doomer Doug is online now Veteran Member

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    Gee, ain’t this special, HE <G> If you recall a few years ago the “Iranian commander” in the war games SANK MULTIPLE USA CAPITAL SHIPS USING THE SAME TACTICS AND STRATEGY. OF COURSE THE PENTAGON DECLARED THE RESULTS NOT VALID AND REDEFINED THE LIMITS TO LET THE USA WIN. ROTFLMAO

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worl…ary-drill.html

    Iran’s armed forces launched a speedboat attack on a giant model of a US aircraft carrier on Wednesday as the Revolutionary Guard staged military exercises in the Gulf.

    The aim of the drill was to practise how to sink an American carrier, at least two of which patrol the Gulf at any given time.

    A helicopter and speed boat circle a damaged replica of a US aircraft carrier

    Exercise “Great Prophet Nine” showed how the naval wing of the Revolutionary Guard would launch a “swarm” attack, seeking to overwhelm the carrier’s defences by dispatching numerous speedboats to converge on the vessel from all directions.

    “American aircraft carriers are very big ammunition depots housing a lot of missiles, rockets, torpedoes and everything else,” said Admiral Ali Fadavi, the naval commander of the Revolutionary Guard. He told state television that hitting a carrier with just one missile could trigger a “large secondary explosion”.
    Related Articles

    The exercise was carried out near the Strait of Hormuz, a vital waterway at the entrance to the Gulf. The US Navy’s Fifth Fleet is based in the nearby kingdom of Bahrain.

    However, American forces believe they have little to fear from the Revolutionary Guard. The US deploys 10 nuclear-powered carriers, each one of which can embark about 80 aircraft with more striking power than the entire Iranian air force.

    Commander Kevin Stephens, the spokesman for the Fifth Fleet, said the exercise had not disrupted maritime traffic. “We’re quite confident of our naval forces’ ability to defend themselves,” he told Associated Press news agency. “It seems they’ve attempted to destroy the equivalent of a Hollywood movie set.”

    Doomer Doug, a.k.a. Doug McIntosh now has a blog at www.doomerdoug.wordpress.com
    My end of the world e book “Day of the Dogs” will soon be available for sale at smashwords. The url is
    https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/267340 It is also at the following url
    http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B007BRLFYU
  8. #168

    Doomer Doug is online now Veteran Member

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    A FOOL IS THOUGHT WISE UNTIL HE OPENS HIS MOUTH TO SPEAK. Well, just duh Kerry. You thunk maybe Iran had a hand in all this do you? he he he

    Quote Originally Posted by Housecarl View Post
    For links see article source…..
    Posted for fair use…..
    http://nation.com.pk/international/2…men-govt-kerryIran ‘contributed’ to collapse of Yemen govt: Kerry
    February 25, 2015
    AFP

    WASHINGTON – Iran’s support for rebels in Yemen “contributed” to the militia’s takeover of the Yemeni capital and the collapse of the government, top US diplomat John Kerry said Tuesday.

    Speaking to US lawmakers, Kerry agreed Tehran’s support for the Huthi militia was “critical” in shoring up the rebels.

    Asked whether the Yemeni government collapsed because of Iran’s support for the Huthi, Kerry replied: “I think it contributed to it .. without any question whatsoever.”

    “But I do know that the Iranians were surprised by the events that took place and are hoping to see a national dialogue” take place,” Kerry told the Senate appropriations committee, at the start of two days of intense budget hearings.

    Kerry met Sunday and Monday in Geneva with his Iranian counterpart Mohammad Javad Zarif for talks on Tehran’s nuclear program, but acknowledged he had had “brief conversations” on other topics.

    Yemen’s Gulf neighbors have rejected the sidelining of the Western-backed President Abedrabbo Mansour Hadi as a “coup,” while the UN Security Council has urged the militia to withdraw its forces from government institutions.

    An aide to Hadi said Tuesday the embattled leader has retracted his resignation after escaping house arrest in the militia-controlled capital, Sanaa, at the weekend.

    Hadi had tendered his resignation last month after the Shiite militia seized the presidential palace and besieged his residence in Sanaa.

    Kerry revealed he planned to meet on Friday with leaders of the Gulf Cooperation Council in London to discuss the crisis in Yemen among other issues.

    The United States closed down its embassy in Yemen earlier this month, along with France and Britain, amid growing concerns about insecurity in the country.
    The Huthis, whose power base is in the mainly Shiite northern highlands, overran Sanaa unopposed five months ago.

    They have pushed their advance south and west into mainly Sunni areas, where they have met with fierce resistance from tribesmen and Yemen’s powerful branch of Al-Qaeda.

    Doomer Doug, a.k.a. Doug McIntosh now has a blog at www.doomerdoug.wordpress.com
    My end of the world e book “Day of the Dogs” will soon be available for sale at smashwords. The url is
    https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/267340 It is also at the following url
    http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B007BRLFYU
  9. #169

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    http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/…0LV1RH20150227

    UAE and Kuwait to reopen embassies in Yemen’s south, backing Hadi

    DUBAI Fri Feb 27, 2015 2:50pm EST

    (Reuters) – The United Arab Emirates and Kuwait will reopen their Yemeni embassies in the southern city of Aden instead of the capital Sanaa, the two countries’ state news agencies said on Friday.

    Sanaa was captured in September by the Shi’ite Muslim Houthi militia, which placed President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi under house arrest and forced him to announce his resignation. Arab and Western states this month evacuated their Sanaa embassies.

    Parliament never approved the resignation, and on Sunday Hadi fled to Aden where he has set up a new seat of power.

    An aide to Hadi said on Thursday that Yemen’s neighbor Saudi Arabia, the Sunni-ruled main Gulf Arab power, was moving its ambassador to Aden.

    UAE Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Anwar Gargash said the UAE had made its decision “in order to entrench constitutional legitimacy in Yemen, embodied by President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi and his government”, according to WAM news agency.

    The ascendancy of the Houthis is viewed with alarm by the Gulf’s mostly Sunni Muslim rulers.

    The Gulf Cooperation Council has denounced the Houthi takeover as a coup and fears Shi’ite Iran may gain influence on the peninsula by backing the group.

    The prospect of rival centers of power competing for control of Yemen has raised fears that the impoverished and heavily-armed country may be heading for civil war.

    (Reporting by Ahmed Tolba and Noah Browning; Editing by Andrew Roche)

  10. #170

    Doomer Doug is online now Veteran Member

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    Oh my, the gloves are now coming off.

    In this corner, we have the Houthi Shia Tribesmen, armed by Iran and trained by Hezzbollah; in the other corner, we have the Sunni, armed by the Gulf States. We also have Al Qaida of the Arabian Peninsula running around with RPGs.

    Yep, Yemen is about to explode and you can be very sure Obama is going to get dragged in. It occurs to me, HE the USA is going to be fighting against ISIS in both Syria and Iraq. We will also be fighting against Iranian Proxies the Houthi in Yemen. We also may go to war with Russia over the Ukraine. I mean Obama is now going “Wag the Dog.”

    Doomer Doug, a.k.a. Doug McIntosh now has a blog at www.doomerdoug.wordpress.com
    My end of the world e book “Day of the Dogs” will soon be available for sale at smashwords. The url is
    https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/267340 It is also at the following url
    http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B007BRLFYU
  11. #171

    Housecarl is online now Has No Life – Lives on TB

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    Hummm…….

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    http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/…0LW0RK20150228

    Yemen signs aviation deal with Iran: state news agency

    SANAA Sat Feb 28, 2015 11:34am EST

    (Reuters) – Yemen and Iran signed a civil aviation deal on Saturday, Yemeni state news agency SABA reported, a move that may reflect Tehran’s support for the Shi’ite Muslim militia that now controls Sanaa.

    The deal signed in Tehran by the aviation authorities of both countries allows Yemen and Iran each to fly up to 14 flights a week in both directions, SABA said. The websites of the Iranian and Yemeni national airlines indicated there were currently no flights between the two.

    The Shi’ite Muslim Houthi militia seized Yemen’s capital in September, which eventually led President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi to flee this month to the port city of Aden where he is seeking to set up a rival power center.

    Sunni countries in the Gulf fear that events in Yemen show Shi’ite power Iran asserting its influence, something Tehran denies.

    U.S. officials have also expressed concern that the rule of the resolutely anti-American Houthis will harm their counter-terrorism efforts in a country that has one of the most active branches of the Sunni Islamist militant group al Qaeda.

    (Reporting by Mohamed Ghobari; Editing by Robin Pomeroy)

  12. #172

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    Civil aviation, oh, oh, oh DOOMER DOUG IS ROLLING ON THE FLOOR LAUGHING MY VARIOUS BODY PARTS OFF.

    14 flights a week, seven each way apparently equals SEVEN C-130S FULL OF REVOLUTIONARY GUARDS, GUNS, AMMO, GRENADES, ETC ETC Actually, that is ONE C-130 PER DAY QUICK HOW MANY TONS OF MILITARY STUFF IS THAT PER PLANELOAD.

    I think the C-130 carries 300 COMBAT TROOPS FULLY ARMED PER FLIGHT .

    Well, Doomer Doug called it. He said Iran would POUR MILITARY STUFF IN A TIDAL WAVE INTO YEMEN. Yep, Saudi Arabia’s royal family is now going to officially freak out. I guess the phone lines etc between the gulf states and Saudi Arabia to DC are red hot right now.

    Gee, I wonder how many shoulder fired anti tank, anti aircraft missiles Iran can ship in one planeload.

    HE, I think Iran has been doing this for the last month at least. The real significance of the story is they are now OPENLY ADMITTING THEY ARE COMBAT LOADING THE SHIA HOUTHI TRIBAL PEOPLE.

    Yep, IRAN JUST SAID THEY ARE GOING TO POUR MILITARY SUPPLIES INTO YEMEN TO SUBVERT SUNNI SAUDI ARABIA.

    Of course, the “official story” will be it is all bottled water and blankets. <G>

    Lock and load, gang: it won’t be long before combat reports start coming in from Eastern Saudi Arabia now.

    Doomer Doug, a.k.a. Doug McIntosh now has a blog at www.doomerdoug.wordpress.com
    My end of the world e book “Day of the Dogs” will soon be available for sale at smashwords. The url is
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    http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B007BRLFYU
  13. #173

    Housecarl is online now Has No Life – Lives on TB

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doomer Doug View Post

    Civil aviation, oh, oh, oh DOOMER DOUG IS ROLLING ON THE FLOOR LAUGHING MY VARIOUS BODY PARTS OFF.

    14 flights a week, seven each way apparently equals SEVEN C-130S FULL OF REVOLUTIONARY GUARDS, GUNS, AMMO, GRENADES, ETC ETC Actually, that is ONE C-130 PER DAY QUICK HOW MANY TONS OF MILITARY STUFF IS THAT PER PLANELOAD.

    I think the C-130 carries 300 COMBAT TROOPS FULLY ARMED PER FLIGHT .

    Well, Doomer Doug called it. He said Iran would POUR MILITARY STUFF IN A TIDAL WAVE INTO YEMEN. Yep, Saudi Arabia’s royal family is now going to officially freak out. I guess the phone lines etc between the gulf states and Saudi Arabia to DC are red hot right now.

    Gee, I wonder how many shoulder fired anti tank, anti aircraft missiles Iran can ship in one planeload.

    HE, I think Iran has been doing this for the last month at least. The real significance of the story is they are now OPENLY ADMITTING THEY ARE COMBAT LOADING THE SHIA HOUTHI TRIBAL PEOPLE.

    Yep, IRAN JUST SAID THEY ARE GOING TO POUR MILITARY SUPPLIES INTO YEMEN TO SUBVERT SUNNI SAUDI ARABIA.

    Of course, the “official story” will be it is all bottled water and blankets. <G>

    Lock and load, gang: it won’t be long before combat reports start coming in from Eastern Saudi Arabia now.

    A C-130 can carry 92 passengers/64 paratroopers, 74 litter patients with 5 medics, 6 pallets, 3 Humvees or 2 M113s (45,000 lbs payload).

    Remember though that Iran has 4 cargo B-747s (248,300 lb payload) and 12 Il-76s (42 tonnes payload).

  14. #174

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    The C-130 is what I saw lined up, bays open, waiting on the tarmac at Rhienstine? Airport circa 1974 Germany. We had an 3 am alert based on Cyprus of all things. I knew something was up when they drove up jeeps with the trailer full of 5.56 ammo. We then drove all the trucks, jeeps, yes jeeps, trucks etc to the airport, drove onto the tarmac and sat watching. “They” then told us to drive back to Baumholder since Greece and Turkey weren’t really going to start shooting at each other. LOL

    Iran did have mostly US stuff in 1979. 248,000 pounds is 124 tons of stuff, HE and that is a whole lot of military stuff in one trip.

    Man, Doomer Doug is getting old<G>

    Doomer Doug, a.k.a. Doug McIntosh now has a blog at www.doomerdoug.wordpress.com
    My end of the world e book “Day of the Dogs” will soon be available for sale at smashwords. The url is
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    http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B007BRLFYU
  15. #175

    Housecarl is online now Has No Life – Lives on TB

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doomer Doug View Post

    The C-130 is what I saw lined up, bays open, waiting on the tarmac at Rhienstine? Airport circa 1974 Germany. We had an 3 am alert based on Cyprus of all things. I knew something was up when they drove up jeeps with the trailer full of 5.56 ammo. We then drove all the trucks, jeeps, yes jeeps, trucks etc to the airport, drove onto the tarmac and sat watching. “They” then told us to drive back to Baumholder since Greece and Turkey weren’t really going to start shooting at each other. LOL

    Iran did have mostly US stuff in 1979. 248,000 pounds is 124 tons of stuff, HE and that is a whole lot of military stuff in one trip.

    Man, Doomer Doug is getting old<G>

    Here’s something to consider….The internet quoted weight for an Iranian Sejjil solid fueled MRBM is between 21.5 tons and 38 tons. Add the TEL and that’s one per trip with room for other “filler” in a cargo B-747. While a SCUD (at 15,000 lbs) and a TEL can easily go in an Il-76.

  16. #176

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    http://gulfnews.com/news/gulf/yemen/…ndas-1.1464289

    Aden seethes with separatist agendas

    Yemen’s north-south divide remains raw despite merger in 1990

    By Patrick J. McDonnell
    Published: 03:45 March 1, 2015

    Aden: A replica Big Ben still looks down on the harbour. Queen Victoria casts a dour gaze from her bronzed throne in a patch of green fronting the port.

    But this one-time jewel of the British Empire has fallen on hard times — and now seethes with sedition as Yemen lurches toward civil war and possible disintegration.

    The return last week of ousted President Abd Rabbo Mansour Hadi, a southerner, after weeks of house arrest in the capital, Sana’a, has done little to quell separatist sentiment in Yemen’s south.

    Blue-tinged flags of an erstwhile new independent nation are ubiquitous. Gaggles of pro-independence protesters march on the streets. Separatist slogans line the walls. Talk of rebellion is rampant.

    “If there is no secession, then this area will become the biggest conflict in the Middle East — bigger than Iraq or Syria,” warned Mohammad Nasser Hattab, who heads a “popular committee” militia that has commandeered a police station across from the tattered park where a stolid and plump Victoria still observes the horizon.

    “The situation has gotten to the point that it is us or them on this land,” said Nasser, amid nods of agreement from fellow militiamen with Kalashnikovs and checkered head scarves gathered on the second floor of a dingy police precinct office in the port-side Tawahi district, known as Steamer Point during British rule.

    This fractured nation of 26 million has many hot spots in the aftermath of the fall of the capital, Sana’a, to the northern-based Al Houthi faction. The Al Houthis overran the capital in September and consolidated control in recent weeks, placing Hadi and others in his administration under house arrest and dissolving parliament.

    The emergence of the Al Houthis, who are allies of Iran, threatens to turn Yemen into yet another geopolitical battleground with profound implications for US policy. The nation has until now been relatively free of the sectarian-fuelled violence that has ravaged Iraq and Syria.

    Fostering stability in the country has been a major goal of the Obama administration, which has touted Yemen as a success of its counter-terrorism strategy. The nation is home to Al Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula (Aqap), regarded as among the most potent of the global terrorist network’s branches. US drone strikes continue to hit Al Qaida targets in Yemen, despite the Al Houthi takeover.

    The port of Aden, still bustling but much depleted since its colonial era days as one of the world’s busiest harbours, was the site of a signature Al Qaida attack: The 2000 strike on the US destroyer Cole that left 17 US service members dead and 39 wounded.

    The Al Houthis have vowed to destroy Al Qaida since the terrorists have repeatedly targeted them. But others argue that the Al Houthi advance has become an Al Qaida recruiting bonanza, drawing in Sunni youth and tribesmen.

    “Many tribes had abandoned Al Qaida, but the arrival of Al Houthis in Sana’a pushed the tribes back to Al Qaida,” Aden’s Governor Abdul Aziz Bin Habtoor said in an interview in Aden.

    To the east of Sana’a, Sunni tribes, some allied with Al Qaida, are arming against a possible Al Houthi thrust into resource-rich Marib province, source of much of the nation’s oil and gas and its major energy infrastructure. Sunni tribal leaders have vowed to resist.

    Meanwhile, the central government in Sana’a appears to have lost much of its control over the south.

    Northern and southern Yemen were two countries until merging in 1990, but tensions between the two distinct regions never completely dissipated. Now, the nation’s political turmoil has given a renewed boost to the secessionist agenda.

    The Al Houthis have relatively little support in the south. There is widespread disdain for what southerners call an Al Houthi power grab — though the Al Houthis insist that their goal is a democratic and united state in which all regions are represented.

    Hadi, a former general, as well as a former vice-president under longtime strongman Ali Abdullah Saleh, fled from house arrest and arrived in Aden.

    Many in Aden were outraged that Hadi did not embrace secession upon his return. Instead, he pledged to work toward a political settlement to maintain a unified Yemen — the goal of United Nations-brokered talks.

    “The situation is very dangerous now,” said Mohsin Mohammad Bin Farid, who heads a coalition seeking to create “South Arabia” among eight southern provinces. “The people of the south were hoping that Hadi would be with us, be with independence.”

    Although Hadi has many supporters in Aden, street protesters greeted his statement of unity with the chant: “Hadi, you are contemptible, the blood of the sons of the south is not cheap.”

    So-called popular committee militiamen, on the payroll of political factions and tribes, have set up checkpoints and usurped the security services in parts of the south, including Aden. They bristle with indignation at the idea of Al Houthi-led rule.

    “They [Al Houthis] do not represent a Yemeni point of view,” said Nasser, the popular committee commander near the port, in an apparent reference to Al Houthis’ links to Iran. “They are influenced by external dictates.”

    The future role of Hadi, backed by the United States and its Gulf allies, remains a question mark. Hadi appears to have rescinded his resignation from the presidency — tendered on January 22 while he was under house arrest — and signalled that he favours continued dialogue among all of Yemen’s factions to keep the nation intact. His allies insist that most southerners prefer to remain part of Yemen.

    “The great majority of people in the south support the idea of unity and adhere to the concept of a federal state,” said Bin Habtoor, the Aden governor, who spoke after meeting with the president in Aden.

    But Hadi insists that all appointments and government actions made since September 21, when the Al Houthis overran Sana’a, are null and void. The governor also said talks should be moved from Al Houthi-controlled Sana’a to Aden.

    “Al Houthi forcibly seized power with the gun and he must relinquish power whether he wants to or not,” said Bin Habtoor.

    In Sana’a, however, the Al Houthis have showed no sign of pulling back. With regional, sectarian and tribal tensions rising, the prospect for compromise appears to be narrowing.

    “What we see in Yemen is a potential humanitarian crisis, the prospect of economic collapse, and possible areas of conflict,” Jamal Bin Omar, the UN special envoy for Yemen, said in an interview in Sana’a. “The prospect for fragmentation is clearly there. We are saying that there is no other way but for all the political parties to come together and make a deal sometime soon.”

    — Los Angeles Times

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    Elijah J. Magnier @EjmAlrai · 1h 1 hour ago

    For the first time since decades, an Iranian commercial airline lands today in Sanaa, #Yemen. #Iran.

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  18. #178

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    Conflict News @rConflictNews · 3m 3 minutes ago

    First Iran air-lines plane landed in #Sanaa carrying humanitarian aid to the #Yemen people – @JewishFeed

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  19. #179

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    Doomer Doug thinks the pallets are part of a pr campaign. Of course, the “trojan plane” is going to show off bottled water for the first load. Sheesh!

    I am thinking Saudi Arabia is going to use the Sunni Al Qaida of the Arabian Peninsula to fight the Shia/Iran Houthi tribal militia. The USA will then be drone bombing the Sunni Al Qadia. It is going to get real complicated in Yemen soon enough.

    Yep, tons of military stuff is now going to be flown into Yemen in support of the Shia tribal militias.

    Doomer Doug, a.k.a. Doug McIntosh now has a blog at www.doomerdoug.wordpress.com
    My end of the world e book “Day of the Dogs” will soon be available for sale at smashwords. The url is
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  20. #180

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    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/joseph…b_6778594.html

    Joseph Braude
    Author, broadcaster, and Middle East specialist

    A Growing Rift Between Washington and the Gulf States on Yemen

    Posted: 03/01/2015 10:12 am EST Updated: 03/01/2015 10:59 am EST

    Activity intensified over the past week at the United Nations with respect to the deteriorating situation in Yemen — amid further evidence of a rift over the country’s future between Washington and its traditional Gulf allies.

    Jamal Benomar, the United Nations special envoy to Yemen, met with Yemeni president Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi at his new headquarters in Aden. He reiterated support for Hadi as the country’s legitimately elected leader, told reporters that his “resumption of duties would help to pull the country together,” and called for a resolution of the crisis within the framework of the “Gulf Initiative.” Meanwhile, the United Nations Security Council decided to extend the mandate of the “group of four” experts on Yemen, which was established to oversee sanctions measures employed against individuals and entities designated as threatening “peace, security or stability “in the country. And the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Friday raised alarms about a growing number of “unlawful arrests, arbitrary detention, and the targeting of journalists” in the country.

    The seeming consistency of the UN position stood in contrast to conflicting signals from Washington. On the one hand, State Department Spokeswoman Jen Psaki told reporters Monday that her government would like “all parties” to “recommit themselves to the GCC initiative, National Dialogue Conference outcomes, and relevant UN Security Council resolutions.” But over a week in which GCC embassies relocated to Aden in solidarity with the Yemeni president, Psaki stated that no one in the Administration had been in touch with Hadi since he arrived in Yemen, and went on to say two days later that she was “unsure about whether there had been any US contact with Hadi since Monday.”

    A flurry of media reports in the United States have meanwhile appeared suggesting that the United States is growing closer to Iran with respect to its Yemeni policies. Michael Vickers, the Undersecretary of Defense for Intelligence, has confirmed that the United States has an intelligence relationship with the Houthi insurgent group to counter al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula. Secretary of State John Kerry, for his part, told U.S. lawmakers last week that he “knows” that the Tehran government was “surprised” at the Houthi takeover of the capital Sanaa. The statement appeared to indicate that Kerry has been in talks with the Tehran regime over Yemen, and was persuaded by the Iranian line. Following his March 2 address to the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva, Kerry will again meet with Iranian foreign minister Jawad Zarif as part of negotiations over the Iranian nuclear project — then visit Riyadh and London to discuss Yemen and other matters with Gulf foreign ministers.

    On a related matter, “Stratfor,” an American private intelligence company, released a report Thursday alleging that private talks were underway in the Gulf with respect to a possible “two-state solution” for Yemen. Such a settlement would eventually place new pressures on the Houthis in Sanaa: According to Muhammad Lutf al-Uryani, Yemen’s former minister of water and the environment, Yemeni has approached a “state of water emergency” – and the capital itself, which stands 3300 meters above sea level with a population of more than 2.5 million, will eventually have to be moved. This costly endeavor will be extremely difficult, particularly if the Houthi rebels do not manage to wrest control over the oil fields of Marib, as they are currently attempting to do in their ongoing military campaign.

    This post is a translation from Joseph Braude’s weekly column in the Moroccan Arabic-language daily Al-Ahdath al-Maghrebiya,. Follow Joseph Braude on Twitter @josephbraude.

  21. #181

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    DANCING WITH THE DEVIL

    Kerry is showing exactly why the Obama administration is going to be the death of us all here in the USA. You can’t make a “deal” with Shia Muslims against Sunni Muslims. I said at the start of the thread one result would be a tactical alliance between the USA and the Shia against the Sunni Al Qaida of the Arabian Peninsula. HE, THEY BOTH WANT TO KILL THE USA!!

    Ergo, there is no possible deal possible between Iran, under the control of extreme Shia factions, and Sunni extreme terror factions, with anybody in the West. The four year mark for both the Arab Spring and Fukushima are showing just how bad things really are on Planet Earth.

    We are likely to end up with a line drawn through Yemen, just like Vietnam and Korea. Whatever Kerry thinks, the Gulf States and Saudi Arabia, much less the Al Qaida group, are NEVER going to tolerate any part of Yemen controlled from Iran.

    We are going to see the kind of civilwar/free-for-all in Yemen we haven’t seen in a while. This will be ignored until Saudi Arabia, or the Suez Canal is threatened.

    Doomer Doug, a.k.a. Doug McIntosh now has a blog at www.doomerdoug.wordpress.com
    My end of the world e book “Day of the Dogs” will soon be available for sale at smashwords. The url is
    https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/267340 It is also at the following url
    http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B007BRLFYU
  22. #182

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    http://www.nationalreview.com/articl…gy-john-hillen

    On Iran: It’s Not about the Bomb, It’s about the Strategy

    Achieving a weak nuclear deal will thrill the arms-control crowd but do little to erode Iran’s campaign to control the Middle East.

    By John Hillen — March 2, 2015

    This weekend’s​ Sunday-morning talk shows remained focused on Benjamin Netanyahu’s speech to Congress and its possible effect on the ongoing talks with Iran on its nuclear program.

    In the meantime, a seemingly innocuous but related event Sunday morning was lightly reported: Yesterday morning, Mahan Air of Iran landed its first commercial flight to Yemen in decades. Even though there is no passenger traffic of almost any sort between Yemen and Iran, Yemen’s new Shiite government and Teheran have scheduled 14 direct flights per week between the two countries.

    This first flight was delivering “medical aid.” Ah, of course. Mahan Air, a “private” airline, was called out in 2011 by the U.S. Department of Treasury “for providing financial, material, and technological support to the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps-Qods Force (IRGC-QF).” Treasury designated the airline a material and transportation supporter of terrorism, saying: “Based in Tehran, Mahan Air provides transportation, funds transfers and personnel travel services to the IRGC-QF.” In Treasury’s 2011 press release on this matter, Under Secretary for Terrorism and Financial Intelligence David S. Cohen said:

    Mahan Air’s close coordination with the IRGC-QF — secretly ferrying operatives, weapons, and funds on its flights — reveals yet another facet of the IRGC’s extensive infiltration of Iran’s commercial sector to facilitate its support for terrorism. Following the revelation about the IRGC-QF’s use of the international financial system to fund its murder-for-hire plot, today’s action highlights further the undeniable risks of doing business with Iran.

    The general pattern, evident over years, shows that Iran has a well-oiled machine for smuggling massive quantities of sophisticated weaponry to Hezbollah in Lebanon and Hamas in the Gaza strip.

    Despite the enormous political and military investment in Yemen over the past decade, the U.S. and its European allies fled the country over the past weeks, as it sank into chaos. Iran saw its chance and was in like a shot. This move is part and parcel of Iran’s national strategy: exporting its revolution through specialized military and intelligence units, gaining hegemony over the Gulf region and the greater Middle East, pushing the U.S. out of the region, and isolating and weakening, if not helping to dismember Israel. In just the past five years, Iran has created or consolidated well-armed satrapies from the Turkish border to the Gulf of Aden, and from the Mediterranean and Red Sea to the heart of Afghanistan.

    The Middle East may be the graveyard of most foreign policies, but Iran’s, by contrast, has been remarkably successful over the past decade. And its success has accelerated dramatically over the last five years. And yet U.S. policy has largely failed to focus on comprehensively confronting, arresting, and rolling back the threat of an increasingly hegemonic Iran. Instead, our Iranian policy — outside of Treasury sanctions — seems to be centered almost entirely on achieving and then celebrating some kind of nuclear deal. (This is the subject of my speech today at AIPAC.)

    There is no doubt that Iranian nuclear weapons would change the balance of power dramatically; inevitably, they would start a nuclear-arms race throughout the Middle East. And we should be more concerned with Iran’s nuclear ambitions than with North Korea’s programs for the simple geopolitical reason that North Korea is a weak state surrounded by strong states while Iran is a strong state surrounded by weak states.

    Even so, Iran’s nuclear ambitions are just a means — a tool. It is Iran’s geo-strategy on which we should be chiefly focused, not the details of getting a nuclear-arms agreement. Others have written sensibly about why a bad nuclear deal is much worse than no deal, and I do believe that the priests and priestesses of the arms-control crowd are head-down in technical details and hell-bent on getting to any deal, no matter how weak. It is the way they define success — damn its strategic relevance.

    But doing any deal right now — at the very moment when Iran is achieving unprecedented success in its campaign to destabilize the entire region — is like cheering about saving a tree as the forest burns all around. It is strategically incongruous, if not ultimately debilitating, to be having a let’s-reach-a-deal dialogue with Iran right now on this one set of means. It’s not the bomb; it’s the strategy that is our problem.

    — John Hillen is the chairman of National Review and a former assistant secretary of state.

  23. #183

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    http://www.wsj.com/articles/john-vin…bit-1425327322

    Russia’s Missile Gambit

    Offering antiballistic missiles to Iran, currying favor with the mullahs.

    By John Vinocur
    March 2, 2015 3:15 p.m. ET
    1 COMMENTS

    From deep in a world of wishful thinking, the White House’s press secretary, Josh Earnest, said on Friday that the Obama administration is hopeful of holding together “the unanimity of support” it is getting from countries described as a coalition working together to stop Iran’s rush toward nuclear weapons.

    Was the White House closed for a spiritual retreat earlier in the week? Because last Monday, Russia offered to sell the Islamic Republic its most advanced S-300VM Antey-2500 antiballistic missiles. They would protect the mullahs’ nuclear installations from eventual strikes by Israel and/or—you couldn’t have forgotten President Barack Obama’s warnings that “everything remains on the table”—the United States.

    Here was an extraordinary moment that roused barely a peep from the administration and piddling press coverage in the U.S., France, Britain and Germany, the countries that make up with Russia and China the American-led group negotiating with Tehran.

    Extraordinary because Moscow deliberately picked a decisive phase in the bargaining process to send a brazen signal. And a coherent one in the sense that its gesture was one of unmistakable contempt for the U.S. and the West.

    Most important, the missile proposition was immediately destabilizing since it savaged the notion, cherished in Washington and Western Europe, that the Kremlin is committed to compartmentalizing its approach to Iran—that is, walling it off into a cooperative sanitary zone away from the lies, maneuvers and gun-in-hand Russian strategy concerning Ukraine and the security of Europe.

    Instead, the move said the Russians think they can both oppose Iran getting nukes and, through the offer of the missiles, come out from the current talks, concluding at the end of March, with the mullahs on their side regardless of the negotiations’ results. That’s hardly a Tehran moving closer to America, an event which the Obama administration seems to fantasize will accompany a deal.

    For emphasis, Vladimir Putin ’s old KGB pal, Sergei Chemezov, head of the Russian state-weapons conglomerate Rostec, personally proposed supplying the missiles. Add this dose of spite: Mr. Chemezov is on Washington’s Crimea sanctions list. He said the Iranians are thinking the offer over.

    The Antey-2500 missiles are a substantially improved version of the S-300V the Russians contracted to sell to Iran in 2007. The deal was cancelled by Russia in 2010 after a United Nations Security Council resolution banning the sale or transfer to Iran of missile systems. Russian accounts say the Antey-2500 missiles on offer aren’t listed among the excluded systems.

    The U.S. reaction was of the don’t-bother-us mode. “It’s just some reports,” said the State Department’s spokeswoman, Jen Psaki. Apparently the direct quotes from Mr. Chemezov via a Russian state-run news agency, stating that “We offered the Antey-2500 instead of the S-300,” don’t count.

    Ms. Psaki issued a clause saying maybe-we’ll-take-a-look-later-at-an-appropriate-level, as if to cut off the story’s legs.

    A good way to evaluate the Obama administration’s connection with reality on dealing with Iran was once to check this or that potentially deluded aspect with the French. They hadn’t inexactly called themselves “the guardians of the temple” on nuclear proliferation. Example: In 2013, when an interim agreement was about to be signed setting up the current talks with Iran, France successfully insisted that neutralization of the mullahs’ Arak nuclear site be included. America was prepared to leave it out.

    And for verbal resolve on Iran, you couldn’t do better than when President François Hollande told Saudi Arabia’s royals in 2013 that France sought “the certainty, the guarantee that Iran definitively renounces atomic weapons.”

    But now, when I asked a senior French official participating in the Iran negotiations about the Russian missile gambit and its implications, he responded: “Juridically, they can do it.” He added, “Politically, we’re not following it now.”

    Talk about compartmentalization. The lessons of Russia’s march into Ukraine or its maneuvers on NATO’s borders won’t be superimposed onto Paris’s strategy for dealing with Iran, marking a French willingness, more in line with Washington’s, to disconnect from the issue’s widest realities.

    So where are the French “guardians of the temple” these days, the ornery nuclear nags previously ready, they said, to lie across the tracks of an ambiguous or plainly bad deal that would leave Iran with an eventual good shot at nukes?

    George Perkovich, the nuclear-security-and-proliferation expert who is vice president of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, told me, referring to the “guardians” and Iran: “It’s become a different world. The circumstances and issues in the negotiations are not nearly as propitious as they once saw them.”

    Russia apart—although the West’s unwillingness to deal with Moscow’s new disruptiveness on Iran says a lot about how it will ultimately face up to the mullahs—I wanted to know from the French how they see things turning out.

    “The question for us is not Obama versus Netanyahu,” the senior French official said, seeking to return to the old sound of French noncompromise and autonomy on an issue of enormous importance. “The question is a weak agreement against a robust one. At this stage, the agreement with Iran currently under discussion is not robust.”

    He added very diplomatically, “Of course, in three weeks, we’ll see.”

    Mr. Vinocur is former executive editor of the International Herald Tribune.

  24. #184

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    Hummm……..

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    http://atimes.com/atimes/Middle_East/MID-01-040315.html

    Middle East
    Mar 4, ’15
    World bows to Iran’s hegemony
    By Spengler

    The problem with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s address to the US Congress was not the risk of offending Washington but Washington’s receding relevance. World powers, including China, have elected to legitimize Iran’s dominant position, hoping to delay but not deter its eventual acquisition of nuclear weapons. But war cannot be avoided; it is inevitable.

    The problem with Israeli Prime Minister Benyamin Netanyahu’s address to Congress March 3 was not the risk of offending Washington, but rather Washington’s receding relevance. President Barack Obama is not the only leader who wants to acknowledge what is already a fact in the ground, namely that “Iran has become the preeminent strategic player in West Asia to the increasing disadvantage of the US and its regional allies,” as a former Indian ambassador to Oman wrote this week.

    For differing reasons, the powers of the world have elected to legitimize Iran’s dominant position, hoping to delay but not deter its eventual acquisition of nuclear weapons. Except for Israel and the Sunni Arab states, the world has no desire to confront Iran. Short of an American military strike, which is unthinkable for this administration, there may be little that Washington can do to influence the course of events. Its influence has fallen catastrophically in consequence of a chain of policy blunders.

    The best that Prime Minister Netanyahu can hope for is that the US Congress will in some way disrupt the Administration’s efforts to strike a deal with Iran by provoking the Iranians. That is what the White House fears, and that explains its rage over Netanyahu’s appearance.

    Tehran may overplay its hand, but I do not think it will. The Persians are not the Palestinians, who discovered that they were a people only a generation ago and never miss an opportunity to miss and opportunity; they are ancient and crafty, and know an opportunity when it presents itself.

    Most of the world wants a deal, because the alternative would be war. For 10 years I have argued that war is inevitable whatever the diplomats do, and that the question is not if, but how and when. President Obama is not British prime minister Neville Chamberlain selling out to Hitler at Munich in 1938: rather, he is Lord Halifax, that is, Halifax if he had been prime minister in 1938. Unlike the unfortunate Chamberlain, who hoped to buy time for Britain to build warplanes, Halifax liked Hitler, as Obama and his camarilla admire Iran.

    China is Chamberlain, hoping to placate Iran in order to buy time. China’s dependence on Middle East oil will increase during the next decade no matter what else China might do, and a war in the Persian Gulf would ruin it.

    Until early 2014, China believed that the United States would guarantee the security of the Persian Gulf. After the rise of Islamic State (ISIS), it concluded that the United States no longer cared, or perhaps intended to destabilize the region for nefarious reasons. But China does not have means to replace America’s presence in the Persian Gulf. Like Chamberlain at Munich, it seeks delay.

    Obama, to be sure, portrays his policy in the language of balance of power. He told the New Yorker’s David Remnick in 2014, “It would be profoundly in the interest of citizens throughout the region if Sunnis and Shias weren’t intent on killing each other. And although it would not solve the entire problem, if we were able to get Iran to operate in a responsible fashion – not funding terrorist organizations, not trying to stir up sectarian discontent in other countries, and not developing a nuclear weapon – you could see an equilibrium developing between Sunni, or predominantly Sunni, Gulf states and Iran in which there’s competition, perhaps suspicion, but not an active or proxy warfare.”

    That, as the old joke goes, is the demo version. On the ground, the US has tacitly accepted the guiding role of Iranian commanders in Iraq’s military operations against ISIS. It is courting the Iran-backed Houthi rebels who just overthrow a Saudi-backed regime in Yemen. It looks the other way while its heavy arms shipments to the Lebanese army are diverted to Hezbollah.

    At almost every point at which Iran has tried to assert hegemony over its neighbors, Washington has acquiesced. “In the end, peace can be achieved only by hegemony or by balance of power,” wrote Henry Kissinger. The major powers hope for peace through Iranian hegemony, although they differ in their estimate of how long this will last.

    Apart from its nuclear ambitions, the broader deal envisioned by Washington would leave Iran as a de facto suzerain in Iraq. It would also make Iran the dominant power in Lebanon (via Hezbollah), Syria (via its client regime) and Yemen (through its Houthi proxies). Although Sunni Muslims outnumber Shi’ites by 6:1, Sunni populations are concentrated in North Africa, Turkey and South Asia. Iran hopes to dominate the Levant and Mesopotamia, encircling Saudi Arabia and threatening Azerbaijan.

    It is grotesque for America to talk of balance of power in the Persian Gulf, because America destroyed the balance of power that defined the region’s politics from the end of the First World War until 2006, when Washington pushed through majority rule in Iraq.

    The imperialist powers in their wisdom established a power balance on two levels. First, they created a Sunni-dominated state in Iraq opposite Shi’ite Iran. The two powers fought each other to a standstill during the 1980s with the covert encouragement of the Reagan administration. Nearly a million soldiers died without troubling the world around them.

    Second, the Sykes-Picot agreement of 1916 created two states, Syria and Iraq, in which minorities ruled majorities – the Alawite minority in Syria, and the Sunni minority in Iraq. Tyranny of a minority may be brutal, but a minority cannot exterminate a majority.

    America’s first great blunder was to force majority rule upon Iraq. As Lt General (ret.) Daniel Bolger explained in a 2014 book, “The stark facts on the ground still sat there, oozing pus and bile. With Saddam gone, any voting would install a Shiite majority. The Sunni wouldn’t run Iraq again. That, at the bottom, caused the insurgency. Absent the genocide of Sunni Arabs, it would keep it going.”

    Under majority Shi’ite rule, Iraq inevitably became Iran’s ally. Iranian Revolutionary Guards are now leading its campaign against the Sunni resistance, presently dominated by ISIS, and Iranian officers are leading Iraqi army regulars.

    This was the work of the George W Bush administration, not Obama. In its ideological fervor for Arab democracy, the Republicans opened the door for Iran to dominate the region. Condoleezza Rice, then Bush’s National Security Advisor, proposed offering an olive branch to Iran as early as 2003. After the Republicans got trounced in the 2006 Congressional elections, defense secretary Donald Rumsfeld got a pink slip, vice president Dick Cheney got benched, and “realist” Robert Gates – the co-chairman of the 2004 Council on Foreign Relations task force that advocated a deal with Iran – took over at Defense.

    In the past, China has sought to strike a balance between Saudi Arabia and Iran with weapons sales, among other means. One Chinese analyst observes that although China’s weapons deliveries to Iran are larger in absolute terms than its sales to Saudi Arabia, it has given the Saudis its best medium-range missiles, which constitute a “formidable deterrent” against Iran.

    As China sees the matter, its overall dependency on imported oil is rising, and the proportion of that oil coming from Iran and its perceived allies is rising. Saudi Arabia may be China’s biggest provider, but Iraq and Oman account for lion’s share of the recent increase in oil imports. China doesn’t want to rock the boat with either prospective adversary.

    Among the world’s powers, China is the supreme rationalist: it views the world in terms of cold self-interest and tends to assume that others also view the world this way. One of China’s most respected military strategists told me bluntly that the notion of a nuclear exchange between Israel and Iran (and by implication any regional nuclear power and Iran) was absurd: the Iranians, he argued, know that a nuclear-armed Israel could destroy them in retaliation.

    Other Chinese analysts are less convinced and view Iran’s prospective acquisition of nuclear weapons with trepidation. It is not only war with Israel but with Saudi Arabia that concerns the oil-importing Chinese. For the time being, Beijing has decided to accommodate Iran. In a March 2 commentary, Xinhua explicitly rejected Israeli objections:
    The US Congress will soon have a guest, Israeli Prime Minster Benjamin Netanyahu, who is expected to try to convince lawmakers that a deal with Iran on its nuclear program could threaten the very existence of the Jewish state.

    Despite the upcoming pressure, policymakers in Washington should have a clear mind of the potential dangers of back-pedaling on the current promising efforts for a comprehensive deal on the Iranian nuclear issue before a March 31 deadline …

    With a new round of talks in Switzerland pending, it is widely expected that the P5+1 [the five permanent members of the UN Security Council plus Germany] could succeed in reaching a deal with Iran to prevent the latter from developing a nuclear bomb, in exchange for easing sanctions on Tehran.

    The momentum does not come easy and could hardly withstand any disturbances such as a surprise announcement by Washington to slap further sanctions on Tehran.

    The Obama administration needs no outside reminder to know that any measures at this stage to “overwhelm” Iran will definitely cause havoc to the positive atmosphere that came after years of frustration over the issue.

    While it is impossible for Washington to insulate itself from the powerful pro-Israel lobbyist this time, the US policymakers should heed that by deviating from the ongoing endeavor on Iran they may squander a hard-earned opportunity by the international community to move closer to a solution to the Iran nuclear issue, for several years to come if not forever.
    Russia has taken Iran’s side explicitly, for several reasons.

    First, Russia has stated bluntly that it would help Iran in retaliation for Western policy in Ukraine, as I wrote in this space January 28. Second, Russia’s own Muslim problem is Sunni rather than Shi’ite. It has reason to fear the influence of ISIS among its own Muslims. If Iran fights ISIS, it serves Russian interests. Russia, to be sure, does not like the idea of a nuclear power on its southern border, but its priorities place it squarely in Iran’s camp.

    The Israeli prime minister asserted that the alternative to a bad deal is not war, but a better deal. I do not think he believes that, but Americans cannot wrap their minds around the notion that West Asia will remain at war indefinitely, especially because the war arises from their own stupidity.

    Balance of power in the Middle East is inherently impossible today for the same reason it failed in Europe in 1914, namely a grand demographic disequilibrium: Iran is on a course to demographic disaster, and must assert its hegemony while it still has time.

    Game theorists might argue that Iran has a rational self-interest to trade its nuclear ambitions for the removal of sanctions. The solution to a multi-period game – one that takes into account Iran’s worsening demographic weakness – would have a solution in which Iran takes great risks to acquire nuclear weapons.

    Between 30% and 40% of Iranians will be older than 60 by mid-century (using the UN Population Prospect’s Constant Fertility and “Low” Variants). Meanwhile, its military-age population will fall by a third to a half.

    Belated efforts to promote fertility are unlikely to make a difference. The causes of Iranian infertility are baked into the cake – higher levels of female literacy, an officially-sanctioned culture of sexual license administered by the Shi’ite clergy as “temporary marriage,” epidemic levels of sexually-transmitted disease and inbreeding. Iran, in short, has an apocalyptic regime with a lot to be apocalyptic about.

    Henry Kissinger is right: peace can be founded on either hegemony or balance of power. Iran cannot be a hegemon for long because it will implode economically and demographically within a generation. In the absence of either, the result is war. For the past 10 years I have argued in this space that when war is inevitable, preemption is the least damaging course of action. I had hoped that George W Bush would have the gumption to de-fang Iran, and was disappointed when he came under the influence of Condoleezza Rice and Robert Gates. Now we are back in 1938, but with Lord Halifax rather than Neville Chamberlain in charge.

    Spengler is channeled by David P Goldman. He is Senior Fellow at the London Center for Policy Research and Associate Fellow at the Middle East ForumHis book How Civilizations Die (and why Islam is Dying, Too)

  25. It is always nice when the mainstream types confirm Doomer Doug’ doomerism! Gee, imagine Iran flying in military supplies to Yemen, HE?

    I also saw where the ISIS guy in Iraq, after he fled Mosul for Syria so he won’t get bombed, called for Jihad against the Shia/Houthi tribal group in Yemen by Sunni ISIS forces in Yemen. Doomer Doug was unaware of any ISIS forces in Yemen, but so what? At any rate, it looks like Yemen is going to explode in multiple battles based on what is now going on. Iran is also starting the process of taking over Iraq.
    The Sunni in Iraq, the ones stupid enough to join ISIS are going to be like the Indians who sided with France in 1763. After the English won the French and Indian War they joined with the colonists to stomp them into the ground and steal their land. Yep, Iran is moving on a broad front to seize control of as much land as it can.

    The question of “Who Won in Iraq,” is best answered by, “Iran of course.”